Please reopen/fix IDEA-20729

Having the console output limited without a simple GUI option to change this (as we did) is not workable.

Please re-open this issue and reinstate the GUI configuration for the console limit that was removed - ideally in the config settings and also via a right click option on the console tab.

This is a step backwards in usability.

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Hello Nick,

Yes, obviously this is a step backwards in usability. It was meant to be.

In the perfect world, the performance of our console would not be affected
by the amount of text you put in there, and there would be no need for this
option at all. In the world that we actually live in, many users suffer from
IDEA performance problems because of excessively large console output that
they don't read or use in any way. Because of this, we'd much rather tell
the few users who actually suffer from this problem about the option in idea.properties,
and let all the others enjoy a faster IDE.

Having the console output limited without a simple GUI option to
change this (as we did) is not workable.

Please re-open this issue and reinstate the GUI configuration for the
console limit that was removed - ideally in the config settings and
also via a right click option on the console tab.

This is a step backwards in usability.


--
Dmitry Jemerov
Development Lead
JetBrains, Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com/
"Develop with Pleasure!"


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IDEA didnt use to have this option.  It was added because someone was complaining about too much output.
Many users on here stated that having so much output isnt useful.  So dont log it.

On the occasions when I want to log lots of output, Id like a quick way to remove this restriction.

I dont think IDEA should be preventing users from shooting themselves in the foot if they really want to - the issue of too much output isnt really an IDEA problem - its a developer issue.

This was exactly why this GUI config option was added (to appease those developers that were complaining about their programs logging too much output) - having to restart an editor to change an option that already existed and has since been removed is not a pleasure.

Why not just leave the option in there, defaulted to 1024K ?

This really should be a per-runtime configuration, not an entire IDEA application setting.

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+1 for re-opening.  being able to see console output is an incredibly important feature.  its so basic, its not often mentioned...but its very very important.  imagine if you had no console output?

just because stupid IDEA users make the setting too large, should not mean it has to be so difficult to configure for teh few of us that need to set it larger in some cases.  why not just have a popup when editing the value to say, "Changing this seeting to be large will result in some performance loss.  It is not recommended".

The logic to remove it doesnt make sense to me.  you are just making it harder for people to change.  if you want IDEA to be fast for all users, just set a sensible default.

what if i edit the idea.properties to some large value then complain about performance?  that's as legitimate of a complaint as someone who changed the value in the UI. by that argument, you shoudl remove the option to change it all together.

If there are known configurations (like system dir on a network drive) that make IDEA unperformant, just make that info more visible, dont try to hide the flexibility. (how about removing modal dialogs to give a perception of performance boost?)

some ideas:

- add the console limit setting to the run configuration dialog.  by default, it will take the default (idea.properties) setting.
- add it back to where it was in IDEA 7
- add it to the run window itself

-Trevor

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Trevor wrote on 24.12.2008 20:02:

some ideas:

- add the console limit setting to the run configuration dialog. by default, it will take the default (idea.properties) setting.
- add it back to where it was in IDEA 7
- add it to the run window itself


+1

IMO, having the setting in the run window itself would be the best
option. For example a toggle button for making the output buffer
infinite. Or a slider on logarithmic scale, with minimum being the
default buffer size and maximum being infinite. When the setting is set
to non-default, there will be a warning message next to the
button/slider warning about poor performance.

A typical use case of when I may need to increase the output buffer is
when debugging some code with System.out.println() lines. After entering
some println()s and running the app, if I notice too much output, then I
would increase the limit to infinite (or maybe 10-100MB) and re-run the
app. Then when I don't need those println()s anymore, I will remove them
and reset the output buffer length to defaults.

For example, I'm right now making an application server and some days
ago I had unexpected behaviour with its database. I was not sure why my
unit tests failed, so I added some println()s which printed the contents
of the database on every database modification (obviously lots of output
lines), so that I could examine more closely what was happening when
running the unit tests.

--
Esko Luontola
www.orfjackal.net

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+1 For being able to set it on the run window itself, since most of the time
I want very little output, but the times I want lots of output I really need
lots of output.

Alas, the current way it's implemented, my general performance ends up
suffering because I can't change the output setting without restarting, so I
end up having to make the output buffer 2048K for the 5% of the time that I
need it, instead of making it something like 256K and then upping it when I
need to.

;ted

"Esko Luontola" <esko.luontola@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:giu3aj$he$1@is.intellij.net...

Trevor wrote on 24.12.2008 20:02:

>> some ideas:
>>
>> - add the console limit setting to the run configuration dialog. by
>> default, it will take the default (idea.properties) setting.
>> - add it back to where it was in IDEA 7
>> - add it to the run window itself
>

+1

>

IMO, having the setting in the run window itself would be the best option.
For example a toggle button for making the output buffer infinite. Or a
slider on logarithmic scale, with minimum being the default buffer size
and maximum being infinite. When the setting is set to non-default, there
will be a warning message next to the button/slider warning about poor
performance.

>

A typical use case of when I may need to increase the output buffer is
when debugging some code with System.out.println() lines. After entering
some println()s and running the app, if I notice too much output, then I
would increase the limit to infinite (or maybe 10-100MB) and re-run the
app. Then when I don't need those println()s anymore, I will remove them
and reset the output buffer length to defaults.

>

For example, I'm right now making an application server and some days ago
I had unexpected behaviour with its database. I was not sure why my unit
tests failed, so I added some println()s which printed the contents of the
database on every database modification (obviously lots of output lines),
so that I could examine more closely what was happening when running the
unit tests.

>

--
Esko Luontola
www.orfjackal.net



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+1.  I just wasted 45 minutes searching for a solution to this, finally discovering the idea.properties setting: idea.cycle.buffer.size=disabled.

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+1 for adding this back in to the IDE.

Forcing this limitation for performance reasons seems silly when a simple disclaimer in a dialog box could tell the user that "setting the buffer size to unlimited may cause performance issues."

How about adding a "Clear Buffer" option in the Run window to free up resources?

Eclipse has these options and works fine, so why not Intellij?

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This seems like an obvious feature.

Please consider this as a preference that can be set on a per-project basis.

jjm

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