TMate functionality in IDEA

Hello everyone,

Now that the topic has been brought up, could you please describe which of
TMate's features you would most like to see in IDEA and/or TeamCity?

--
Dmitry Jemerov
Software Developer
JetBrains, Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com/
"Develop with Pleasure!"


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A lot of it is already there in TeamCity, or on the roadmap for Selena/Agra. The most useful thing not already in plan was project change metrics, particularly broken down by developer/module.

--Dave Griffith

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We currently use TMate for the following:

1) Reviewing code changes made by individual developers
2) Ensuring the same bug fixes are made to different branches of code
3) Creating release notes

It also gives us the ability to easily look at the files changed in an individual Subversion commit.

I'd prefer to keep as much of that as possible in IDEA, since we're unlikely to make any move to TeamCity until it supports other IDEs (we currently have people using NetBeans and Eclipse here as well).

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I use TMate to instantly see all the CVS changes made to one or more projects, filterable by user, by project structure, by time and by tags, sorted and grouped by any of component, module, week, month, user, tag, or relative date. The filtering available on these views is invaluable, and I find the way it highlights new 'unread' changes very useful.

I like to be able to click on a change on the list and immediately see the CVS comments associated with the change, and to instantly compare any change point with the local file, or compare the files for any two changes on the list. I like to click on a change to see the repository version source, or the local source, or the CVS change history.

I continually use the Pending Updates feature that lists the files that need to be updated to match the latest repository version of the current project (i.e. changes by other developers), and lists the CVS comments associated with each, allowing the changed source or the differences to be viewed. I update my project files directly from this list, either selectively or all at once.

I don't use the repository transaction reporting and analysis features on a daily basis, but they are useful to track the relative activity of developers or modules over various periods.

The key advantage of TMate is that all these features are immediately available from a single embedded plug-in frame in the IDEA IDE, rather than being scattered around various menus or in a separate browser. There is no delay when viewing any of the repository changes summary data, which can be displayed continuously in the TMate frame and is updated automatically.

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Dave's listed most if not all the reasons I used TMate. We no longer use it because it has a habit of going crazy and hammering the CVS server with so many requests per second that the CVS server starts refusing connections to other clients.

I'd just like to add that if these features are available in TeamCity, I wouldn't be able to use them because we have our own custom build system similar to TeamCity with build agents and web-based control. Perhaps not as snazzy as TeamCity but it does the job and it would be significant work to replace it with TeamCity (if TeamCity had all the features we required).

I strongly believe that repository-wide history inspection like this is a required feature of the version control support in IDEA and should not rely on TeamCity.

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sigh Unreliable servers...

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Hello Gordon,

I'd just like to add that if these features are available in TeamCity,
I wouldn't be able to use them because we have our own custom build
system similar to TeamCity with build agents and web-based control.
Perhaps not as snazzy as TeamCity but it does the job and it would be
significant work to replace it with TeamCity (if TeamCity had all
the features we required).

I strongly believe that repository-wide history inspection like this
is a required feature of the version control support in IDEA and
should not rely on TeamCity.


Same here.

WBR,
Pronam Chatterjee


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I second the idea that VCS browser functionality should be independent of TeamCity - TeamCity is a continuous integration build server. It may use the VCS, but you shouldn't need to run TeamCity to browse the VCS history, run comparisons, etc. They are two separate areas of functionality and should not be conflated.

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