Two Kudos


First, to Sascha. I had never had any professional reason to deal with XPath before my current project, but as soon as I had to start debugging around some of it's quirks today, I figured I'd look to see if anyone had written a plugin. (Okay, full disclosure, I first thought about writing such a plugin myself). Sascha's XPathView turned out to be approximately five times cooler than what I actually needed for the task at hand, and vastly easier to use that I could have hoped. Powerful, unobtrusive, and ver, very cool. I probably would have used a ToolWindow, which would have been overkill compared to his artful use of highlighting and popups. Good one. Thanks.

Second, to JetBrains, for a very small feature extension. I knew I would use the "introduce field and initialize it in JUnit setUp()", but I didn't realize how cool it would actually be in practice. After two days, I never manually create a setUp() method anymore, I just wait until there's something I need to share amongst test cases and have "Introduce field" create the setUp() method automatically. Special thanks to whomever had the balls to make "initialze in setUp()" be the default choice for JUnit classes. Vastly cool, and yet another feature that convinces me that JetBrains not only understands Java, but understands how Java programmers actually do their jobs. Again, good one. Thanks.

--Dave Griffith

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Dave Griffith wrote:

First, to Sascha. I had never had any professional reason to deal
with XPath before my current project, but as soon as I had to start


And thirdly, to Dave himself for all the inspections and intentions.

It's great to see people give, but then show even more gratitude not
when they get, but when they're also given.


(I'm sure theres a subtle different in thought and feelings between
"getting something", and having been "given something", maybe it's just
me thou...

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Dave Griffith wrote:

First, to Sascha. I had never had any professional reason to deal with XPath before my current project, but as soon as I had to start debugging around some of it's quirks today, I figured I'd look to see if anyone had written a plugin. (Okay, full disclosure, I first thought about writing such a plugin myself). Sascha's XPathView turned out to be approximately five times cooler than what I actually needed for the task at hand, and vastly easier to use that I could have hoped. Powerful, unobtrusive, and ver, very cool. I probably would have used a ToolWindow, which would have been overkill compared to his artful use of highlighting and popups. Good one. Thanks.


Umm, thanks, I'm getting red :)

I'm glad you find it useful, and I have to fully agree with Mark that your Inspections & Intentions
brought IDEA to a new level of usefulness. Thank you!

Sascha

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"Dave Griffith" <dave.griffith@cnn.com> wrote in message
news:28828140.1115773346475.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...
>

First, to Sascha. I had never had any professional reason to deal with

XPath before my current project, but as soon as I had to start debugging
around some of it's quirks today, I figured I'd look to see if anyone had
written a plugin. (Okay, full disclosure, I first thought about writing
such a plugin myself). Sascha's XPathView turned out to be approximately
five times cooler than what I actually needed for the task at hand, and
vastly easier to use that I could have hoped. Powerful, unobtrusive, and
ver, very cool. I probably would have used a ToolWindow, which would have
been overkill compared to his artful use of highlighting and popups. Good
one. Thanks.
>

Second, to JetBrains, for a very small feature extension. I knew I would

use the "introduce field and initialize it in JUnit setUp()", but I didn't
realize how cool it would actually be in practice. After two days, I never
manually create a setUp() method anymore, I just wait until there's
something I need to share amongst test cases and have "Introduce field"
create the setUp() method automatically. Special thanks to whomever had the
balls to make "initialze in setUp()" be the default choice for JUnit
classes. Vastly cool, and yet another feature that convinces me that
JetBrains not only understands Java, but understands how Java programmers
actually do their jobs. Again, good one. Thanks.

Thank you, Dave, I'm red now too:)
Eugene.


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