MacOs : jdk = 600M?

(warning: this is a newbie question: I've just purchased my very first Mac. Oh man, what a machine.)

AFAIU, the jdk is found on apple developer forum (registration required),
BUT
you first need to install the XCode tools: about 600M, in 2 dozens fragments

1/ is this right?
2/ if it's right, how does one install all those fragments

12 comments

I am still rather new to OSX as well, but on my Powerbook I found JDK
1.4.1 installed and got 1.4.2 through the software update from the
system menu.

Alain Ravet wrote:

(warning: this is a newbie question: I've just purchased my very first Mac. Oh man, what a machine.)

AFAIU, the jdk is found on apple developer forum (registration required),
BUT
you first need to install the XCode tools: about 600M, in 2 dozens fragments

1/ is this right?
2/ if it's right, how does one install all those fragments

0

Alain Ravet wrote:

(warning: this is a newbie question: I've just purchased my very first Mac. Oh man, what a machine.)

AFAIU, the jdk is found on apple developer forum (registration required),
BUT
you first need to install the XCode tools: about 600M, in 2 dozens fragments

1/ is this right?
2/ if it's right, how does one install all those fragments


Another newbie advice. Developer package should come with CD/DVD with the machine. It's just not installed by default.
So no need to download.

--
Maxim Shafirov
IntelliJ Labs / JetBrains Inc.
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

0

You don't need xcode, in fact that only things that will be useful to IDEA in all that gets installed is:

1) jikes
2) cvs
3) src.jar and javadocs

The rest is just a bunch of developer docs and cocoa development stuff.

Welcome to the world of civilised computing ;)

0

Alain Ravet <alainravet-jetbrains@yahoo.com> wrote:

(warning: this is a newbie question: I've just purchased my very first
Mac. Oh man, what a machine.)


Welcome to Mac!

Just go to Software update and update to the latest version of Java
(~30MB). Additionally, you'll need javadoc and the sources of the jdk.
For that, just go to the developer forum and download the developer
package.

XCode itself is not required unless you want to use it for java
development.

Dirk Dittert.

0

Dirk,

>Just go to Software update and update to the latest version of Java
>(~30MB).
>

AFAIU, this would just update the JRE, wouldn't it?

Additionally, you'll need javadoc and the sources of the jdk.

>For that, just go to the developer f)orum and download the developer
>package.

>

That's the point in my O.P. : the closest thing to Sun JDK I could find
is, AFAIU, the
"java developer package" (50 MB download, 100MB occupied on the HD)
but it wouldn't install, till I installed some
"developer's tools"
I guessed this would be the "Xcode Tools v1.1": 20+ segments of 29 MB
each=> more than 1G on the HD)


>XCode itself is not required unless you want to use it for javabe
>development.


>
It's not very clear, and Apple doesn't help much.

Anyway, I installed the whole stuff, and it works - read "compiles" -
fine now.
There is just one ""little"" problem left : there are no square nor
curly brackets in this bloody keyboard (Powerbook 15", Belgian).
I looked everywhere, but couldn't fine any standard way to do that. It
looks like I'll have to load some opensource/free utility.
Do you recommend any good one? I tried "KeyboardMaestro", but it was
slow (too noticeable delay).


0

> Welcome to the world of civilised computing ;)

I'm really happy to have indulged myself with such a nice "toy", and I'm still learning, but I don't find the Powerbook keyboard very civilised for java development:
- no angle brackets
- no curly brackets
- no vertical - OR - bar
- return key narrower than any other key on the keyboard,
...

BUT
- it's backlighted :) : that's invaluable when you program some secret algorithm in the dark.

0

In article <25210919.1076871369974.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net>,
Alain Ravet < alainravet-jetbrains@yahoo.com> wrote:

I'm really happy to have indulged myself with such a nice "toy", and I'm
still learning, but I don't find the Powerbook keyboard very civilised for
java development:
- no angle brackets
- no curly brackets
- no vertical - OR - bar
- return key narrower than any other key on the keyboard,


Maybe you can return your computer and buy the U.S. version. It has all
those keys.

Or maybe you can order just the keyboard. Keyboards on Mac laptops seem
to pop off rather easily. But knowing Apple, they probably charge $300
for a replacement keyboard.

0

Erik,
> Maybe you can return your computer and buy the U.S. version. It
has all
> those keys.
> Or maybe you can order just the keyboard.

There is a much less radical solution: I'll remap the missing keys, to
match the standard PC keyboard. Why can't Apple use a more standard
keyboard mapping? That's a mystery to me!

Do you know any good - visual and free - remapping tool for MacOs X?
As I wrote in a previous message, I tried KeymapMaestro, but it was
really too slow: there was a noticeable delay.

Alain

0

I am not sure about your keyboard, but although those symbols are not printed on my german one I get curly brackets with ALT + 8 / ALT + 9 and squares ones with ALT + 5 / ALT + 6. The "or" verticar bar is ALT + 7 and the backslash is SHIFT + ALT + 7.

0

Look for an application called Key Caps in Applications/Utilities. It shows you what characters you can type with the various modifier keys pressed.

You should be able to figure out which combination to type on your Belgian keyboard to get the brackets, etc.

Alternatively, go to the Preferences application, International panel, and switch on the U.S. keyboard layout. The letters on your keyboard won't match what you type, but if you can type blind, you can work with it normally.

Maarten

0

Alain Ravet <alain.ravet.list@wanadoo.be> wrote:

Anyway, I installed the whole stuff, and it works - read "compiles" -
fine now.


Sorry, I have XCode installed anyway. Good to hear that it works,
though.

There is just one ""little"" problem left : there are no square nor
curly brackets in this bloody keyboard (Powerbook 15", Belgian).
I looked everywhere, but couldn't fine any standard way to do that. It
looks like I'll have to load some opensource/free utility.


They just don't print it on the keys but Michael already commented on
that. You can also go to the flag of your country in the menu bar,
select open country settings and then cross the checkboxes that allow
you to show the keyboard layout and the dialog to insert characters.
After that you can get quick overview over your keyboard layout from
that menu (helpful if you need special characters and don't know where
to find them).

Best,

Dirk Dittert

0

In article <c0os0j$ad5$1@is.intellij.net>,
Alain Ravet <alain.ravet@biz.tiscali.be> wrote:

Erik,
> Maybe you can return your computer and buy the U.S. version. It
has all
> those keys.
> Or maybe you can order just the keyboard.

There is a much less radical solution: I'll remap the missing keys, to
match the standard PC keyboard. Why can't Apple use a more standard
keyboard mapping? That's a mystery to me!


I've only ever seen Apple's U.S. keyboards. They look startlingly
similar to U.S. PC keyboards. Except prettier :)

Do you know any good - visual and free - remapping tool for MacOs X?
As I wrote in a previous message, I tried KeymapMaestro, but it was
really too slow: there was a noticeable delay.


I've never used such a program, but here's one you might try:

http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/20953

0

Please sign in to leave a comment.