Eclipse transition experience

For anyone else who is contemplating or has made the switch from Eclipse, I've recorded the hilights of my experience moving to Intellij here:

http://points-and-edges.blogspot.com/2009/07/bye-bye-eclipse.html

The post is not a review of Intellij.  It's a series of somewhat random notes that I jotted down as I tried to get into the mindset of how to get things done in Intellij versus Eclipse  Hopefully the content is useful to others going through the same experience.  If I got anything wrong, or you have your own tips, please comment either here or there.

For anyone on the Intellij team - if you think some of the content would be useful in the Eclipse FAQ, feel free to hoist it.  I do reference the FAQ in the post, along with some other key docs and discussions I found.

e

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Thanks for the information.

I also recently switched from Eclipse.  One thing I haven't figured out yet:

In the editor, if I type "buffer.append("

IntelliJ will insert the right parenthesis for me.  And place the cursor between the two.  In eclipse I could press TAB to move the cursor ouside of an automatically inserted paren.  How do I do the same thing in IntelliJ without moving my hand all the way over to the arrow keys?

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Either type the ")" or better in most cases use ctrl-shift-return. That will complete the statement and position the caret on the next line, correctly indented.

Of course, if you want to continue typing after the ")" (for example another chained .append() call, then I think you can only either use the arrow or type the ")".

Keith Winkler wrote:

Thanks for the information.

I also recently switch from Eclipse. One thing I haven't figure out yet:

In the editor, if I type "buffer.append("

IntelliJ will insert the right parenthesis for me. And place the cursor between the two. In eclipse I could press TAB to move the cursor ouside of an automatically inserted paren. How do I do the same thing in IntelliJ without moving my hand all the way over to the arrow keys?

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Original message URL: http://www.jetbrains.net/devnet/message/5241830#5241830

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Really good point.  I had forgotten that I had the same issue.  I was doing Tab-[Swear!]-Delete-Right Arrow all the time.

Another thing I  should have added is the difference with invoking code completion/live templates.  I am  so used to typing "for" and then Ctrl+Space to see the different for-loop templates.  Ditto with while, switch, try, etc.  I have to get used  to remembering all the different specific live template invocations for loops -  iter, itit, itil, iten, itar, etc.  (I'm reading from the cheat-sheet I printed  out to even remember that much.) I also haven't quite gotten used to the different forms of invoking completion - Ctrl+*+Space, Ctrl-J, Alt-Insert, Ctrl-O, Ctrl-I, etc.

On a related note, it seems like the built in list of Live Templates is pretty small.  There aren't any for things like automatically setting up try/catch or try/catch/finally, or a new method (that's not an override or interface method), are there?  Or am I just thinking of this in the wrong way and there is really some other command besides Live Templates that accomplishes these things?

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Of course, seconds after I post the question, I find the code generation page which describes Ctrl-Alt-T.  Similar to what I asked, though not exactly the same.  It seems like there are several places where I am used to starting with a blank slate - e.g. a place in a method where I want to insert a try/catch block or I am outside of any method and I want to create a new one - but the Intellij way of doing things is to write what you want first - e.g. the lines of code that will go into the block or reference the new method in some existing code - and then Intellij has ways of adding the missing pieces - the control block, the method declaration, etc.  Eclipse allows both ways in most situations that I can think of.  Not saying either is better.  It's just nice to have the flexibility to do either.

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There aren't any for things like automatically setting up try/catch or try/catch/finally


Select the code and press CtrlAltT followed by 6 or 7.

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Eric Sword wrote:

Of course, seconds after I post the question, I find the http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/features/code_generation.html which describes Ctrl-Alt-T. Similar to what I asked, though not exactly the same. It seems like there are several places where I am used to starting with a blank slate - e.g. a plac
e in a method where I want to insert a try/catch block or I am outside of any method and I want to create a new one - but the Intellij way of doing things is to write what you want first - e.g. the lines of code that will go into the block or reference the new method in some existing code - and then
Intellij has ways of adding the missing pieces - the control block, the method declaration, etc. Eclipse allows both ways in most situations that I can think of. Not saying either is better. It's just nice to have the flexibility to do either.

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Original message URL: http://www.jetbrains.net/devnet/message/5241836#5241836

If you want such a thing you can just define your own live templates for
these. The point about writing the code first and then surrounding is
that the live template can then fill in things for you, like Exception
types for example.
N.

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Hi Eric,

nice blog entry. I have linked your post from my blog:

http://blogs.jetbrains.com/watchtower/2009/07/here-goes-another-one/

I will also suggest pointing to your post from the Eclipse FAQ.

Btw, I also wrote a NetBeans migration FAQ recently which may be of
interest to some of you :)

http://jetbrains.com/idea/documentation/migration_from_netbeans_faq.html

-Roman

Eric Sword wrote:

For anyone else who is contemplating or has made the switch from Eclipse, I've recorded the hilights of my experience moving to Intellij here:

http://points-and-edges.blogspot.com/2009/07/bye-bye-eclipse.html

The post is not a review of Intellij. It's a series of somewhat random notes that I jotted down as I tried to get into the mindset of how to get things done in Intellij versus Eclipse Hopefully the content is useful to others going through the same experience. If I got anything wrong, or you ha
ve your own tips, please comment either here or there.

For anyone on the Intellij team - if you think some of the content would be useful in the http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/documentation/migration_faq.html, feel free to hoist it. I do reference the FAQ in the post, along with some other key docs and discussions I found.

e

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Original message URL: http://www.jetbrains.net/devnet/message/5241808#5241808

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late invocations for loops - iter, itit, itil, iten, itar, etc. (I'm
reading from the cheat-sheet I printed out to even remember that
much.)


Try typing

it<Ctrl+J>

It'll show you a list of all available live templates that start with "it".


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>> late invocations for loops - iter, itit, itil, iten, itar, etc.
>> (I'm reading from the cheat-sheet I printed out to even remember
>> that much.)
>>

Try typing

it<Ctrl+J>

It'll show you a list of all available live templates that start with
"it".


Or in fact <Ctrl+J> on its own will show you all live templates, then start
typing eg "it" to filter the list of results.

IDEA has tonnes of little features like this, unfortunately some of them
do take a bit of finding. Use the Productivity Guide, Tip of the Day, and
maybe have a look at the Key Promoter plugin.


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could you please keep your article up to date?
e.g. IDEA 8.1.3 with svn 1.6 is already out



i didn't manage to understand the problem with finding sources wile debugging

However, step-wise debugging doesn't work as you may first expect. Even though Intellij knew to display the source file where the breakpoint was, you can't step into any other classes or methods and see the corresponding source file automatically. You must explicitly set which sources are to be associated with the debugging session. This was a bit annoying. I am used to Eclipse automatically finding the associated source files.

could you please clarify it?


i was going to suggest you recording macros for open resource with highlighted word
but IDEA refused to record 'paste into Enter_class_name dialog' action

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