Is there a way to make the compiler report all the errors and not just the first 100?

Hi there - Is there a way to make the compiler report all the errors and not just the first 100? I'm trying to get an idea (no pun :) of the number of dependencies a particular source tree has on other trees. Currently, the message window only shows the first 100 build errors, but, I'd like to see them all! You guys/gals (both jetbrains and the ITN community) are great!! Thanks in advance.

21 comments

This functionality depends on the compiler you are using.
IDEA supports both javac and jikes and I haven't heard about the corresponding options for these compilers. So the answer is "no"
:)

--

Best regards,
Eugene Zhuravlev
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

"ghettogirl" <no_mail@jetbrains.com> wrote in message news:7326434.1067294333352.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

Hi there - Is there a way to make the compiler report all the errors and not just the first 100? I'm trying to get an idea (no pun

:) of the number of dependencies a particular source tree has on other trees. Currently, the message window only shows the first 100
build errors, but, I'd like to see them all! You guys/gals (both jetbrains and the ITN community) are great!! Thanks in advance.


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Interesting, but, if the error view depends on the particular compiler, how is it that Eclipse is able to report (btw this is a customizable option) all the errors? Sorry, yes, I had to turn to the dark side to get what I needed, though the error reporting in Eclipse is very poorly presented (via crappy table), but, it is curious how Eclipse does this? Any thoughts Eugene? Thanks again.

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Eclipse has its own compiler.

--

Best regards,
Maxim Shafirov
JetBrains, Inc / IntelliJ Software
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"


"ghettogirl" <no_mail@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:6589402.1067360188078.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

Interesting, but, if the error view depends on the particular compiler,

how is it that Eclipse is able to report (btw this is a customizable option)
all the errors? Sorry, yes, I had to turn to the dark side to get what I
needed, though the error reporting in Eclipse is very poorly presented (via
crappy table), but, it is curious how Eclipse does this? Any thoughts
Eugene? Thanks again.


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Maxim Shafirov (JetBrains) wrote:

Eclipse has its own compiler.


Now there's a scary thought.

--
Gordon Tyler (Software Developer)
Quest Software <http://java.quest.com/>
260 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4L5, Canada
Voice: 416-643-4846 | Fax: 416-594-1919

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Gordon Tyler wrote:

Maxim Shafirov (JetBrains) wrote:

>> Eclipse has its own compiler.


Now there's a scary thought.


From what I understand, it is top notch. No memory leaks like the one
from Sun.

It is designed with the VisualAge concept of make a change and recompile
continuously. It helps to think of Eclipse as the next generation of
IBM's VisualAge for Java that happens to be free. Essentially that is what
it is.

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Wait a minute that can't be. So you're saying that when I install say the 1.4.1 jre and point my project to it in eclipse, its not actually using the 1.4.1 compiler, but, rather its own!! This is not true In Eclipse, I can specify which jre to compile & run with on a per project basis (actually, you can run compile with one jre and run with another in Eclipse - hint - feature request ;) If I change the choice of jre all the errors generated are different. So it is not true that Eclipse uses its own jre, it may not be calling the javac.exe directly, but, instead calling the compiler in the rt.jar, but, its definitely using the Sun jre!

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ghettogirl wrote:

Wait a minute that can't be. So you're saying that when I install say the
1.4.1 jre and point my project to it in eclipse, its not actually using the
1.4.1 compiler, but, rather its own!! This is not true In Eclipse, I can
specify which jre to compile & run with on a per project basis (actually, you
can run compile with one jre and run with another in Eclipse - hint - feature
request ;) If I change the choice of jre all the errors generated are
different. So it is not true that Eclipse uses its own jre, it may not be
calling the javac.exe directly, but, instead calling the compiler in the
rt.jar, but, its definitely using the Sun jre!


Please don't confuse the compiler with the JRE. Yes Eclipse uses whatever JRE
you want. But it also has its own compiler. Can you override what it wants to
compile with? Sure. But the one that comes with Eclipse is pretty darn good.

Also understand that the javac.exe is merely a wrapper around running the
compiler in the tools.jar. If a Java program wants to run the javac program,
they will execute the one in the tools.jar. Eclipse does not require you to
have that tools.jar--it has its own completely Java compiler.

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I guess that's one of the advantages of having IBM pumping millions into its development ....

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I guess that's one of the advantages of having IBM pumping millions into its development ....


OK, then lets benefit from it.

Tom

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just out of curiosity: what are the advantages of IBM's compiler ?

(except that it can report more than 100 errors.
I would rather prefer a message like "Too many errors. Use fewer." ;)

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? wrote:

just out of curiosity: what are the advantages of IBM's compiler ?

(except that it can report more than 100 errors.
I would rather prefer a message like "Too many errors. Use fewer." ;)


Most important advantage:

Memory leaks are squashed so that it is safe to run in the same JVM.

Beyond that, I understand that it is designed to allow you to recompile
a class as soon as you are done editing a method. That is how Eclipse
tracks all its errors. It isn't due to parsing the class, it is due to
running it through the compiler and letting the compiler flag the issues.

I haven't used the interface myself, but I think you can generate
a list of errors with a build listener of sorts. That will allow you
to filter the types of errors and such.

I also know that the Eclipse compiler can be told to examine certain
types of issues and configure how severely they are treated. For example,
do you want unused private methods to be ignored, a warning, or an error?

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ghettogirl wrote:

+1 :)

+1 here too.

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Will they hand over the compiler then?

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Whom do you mean with "they"?

Tom

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Who owns the compiler? Does it belong to IBM, is it open source?

Don't see it happening; I'm just curious ...

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Who owns the compiler? Does it belong to IBM, is it open source?


I believe, it's under Eclipse' open source license, BTW, a very friendly
license.

Don't see it happening; I'm just curious ...


Me too, but I still have dreams...

Tom

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Rayz wrote:

Will they hand over the compiler then?


It's open source. The license will allow us to use it. It allows Cocoon
to use it...

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Rayz wrote:

Who owns the compiler? Does it belong to IBM, is it open source?

Don't see it happening; I'm just curious ...


Open Source from what I understand--or at least a license that is
permissive.

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Plus it's 20-25% faster on compiling bigger (we have 40000 classes)
projects.

--dejan

Berin Loritsch wrote:

? wrote:

>
>> just out of curiosity: what are the advantages of IBM's compiler ?
>> (except that it can report more than 100 errors.
>> I would rather prefer a message like "Too many errors. Use fewer." ;)
>>
>

Most important advantage:

>

Memory leaks are squashed so that it is safe to run in the same JVM.

>

Beyond that, I understand that it is designed to allow you to recompile
a class as soon as you are done editing a method. That is how Eclipse
tracks all its errors. It isn't due to parsing the class, it is due to
running it through the compiler and letting the compiler flag the issues.

>

I haven't used the interface myself, but I think you can generate
a list of errors with a build listener of sorts. That will allow you
to filter the types of errors and such.

>

I also know that the Eclipse compiler can be told to examine certain
types of issues and configure how severely they are treated. For
example,
do you want unused private methods to be ignored, a warning, or an error?

>

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+1 here as well. Especially if IDEA could use it to track errors more efficiently.

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