Does anyone use Run | JUnit Tests...

Hi!

We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
run, and we'd like to drop it.
The reasons:
1. It's dialog is absolutely unusable if you have more than couple of test
classes.
2. There are much more usable ways to create test configuration.
3. It just exists so it needs to be supported (e.g.now we have temporary
configurations implemented and we have to decide should it produce permanent
configuration or not).

So the question
Does anyone use this feature and why it is better than other ways (go to
Run/Debug Configurations dialog, or create from current context).

Well, we may leave it but we want to know what for?

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

"Develop with pleasure!"


14 comments
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I use it occasionally, for small projects. I've got open tracker requests that would improve it (multi-selection and temporary configurations in particular) and could probably add a few more (tree view), but frankly if you could make that functionality available from the Project window instead I would never use it.

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Never used it, and probably never will. When not dealing with the whole test
structure suite (which I add to the run/debug configuration) I usually run
the tests from the project pane, starting from a class near the top of the
tests hierarchy. The tree structure provides more information than the long
list when choosing what test suite to start with.

Andrei

"Dmitry Peshehonov" <dyoma@intellij.com> wrote in message
news:bdv227$9ce$1@is.intellij.net...

Hi!

>

We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
run, and we'd like to drop it.
The reasons:
1. It's dialog is absolutely unusable if you have more than couple of test
classes.
2. There are much more usable ways to create test configuration.
3. It just exists so it needs to be supported (e.g.now we have temporary
configurations implemented and we have to decide should it produce

permanent

configuration or not).

>

So the question
Does anyone use this feature and why it is better than other ways (go to
Run/Debug Configurations dialog, or create from current context).

>

Well, we may leave it but we want to know what for?

>

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

>

"Develop with pleasure!"

>
>


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Removing it wouldn't be a problem if there was another way to get the
same info,

but unfortunately,
- new Run configuration, and
- new JUnit configuration
do the same things - find the target class - in 2 different ways :


When creating a new Run configuration,
clicking on the ["..."] button next to the 'Main Class' opens a 'choose
Main Class dialog',
=> displays a list of all the valid candidate (Class with a main() method).
It's appropriate, as most projects have only a few Main class.
I like this behaviour, especially when working on code I didn't write.

BTW, that's the same behaviour as "Menu.Run.Junit" : display a list of
all the possible candidate,
but it's missing from "New JUnit configuration" (see below)

When creating a new JUnit configuration,
clicking on the ["..."] button next to the class button opens a 2-tab
dialog, where you have to
- click-find (Tree-view) or
- search-find (Search by name)
a target class.


I'd suggest :
- remove Run.Junit Test, as you suggest

but
- uniformize the "new xxx configuration" ways of selecting/finding a
target class.

Way 1 : merge both ways => 3 tabs per dialog

Way 2 : enhance "search by name"
- to display all the possible candidates, when the value "*" is entered,
and
- display this choice by default, with the '*' text preselected


=> pressing in the dialog would display all the valid candidates
=> entering text would erase the '*' and be used for "Search by name"


Alain

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"Dave Griffith" <dave.griffith@cnn.com> wrote in message
news:9626034.1057165777738.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...
>

I use it occasionally, for small projects. I've got open tracker requests

that would improve it (multi-selection and temporary configurations in
particular) and could probably add a few more (tree view), but frankly if
you could make that functionality available from the Project window instead
I would never use it.

Now Project View supports anything except multi-selection (has tree, has
classes, runs temporaries, creates permanents).
Multi-selection is not supported by JUnit Configuration (it runs single
"target"), so it isn't UI problem.

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

"Develop with pleasure!"


0
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On uniformization.
Applications and tests are quite different:
1. Usually you have a few mains and many-many tests (or no tests at all).
You have little chance to find test in list.
2. Test classes has different names when application classes tends to be
named just Main. Search by name has no much sense.

To find all tests in project you can go to junit.framework.Test and search
for usages and implementing classes. Moreover you may inspect code for
Unused declarations providing JUnit testcases as the only entry points and
find not tested code (however, not all).

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

"Develop with pleasure!"

"Alain Ravet" <alain.ravet.list@wanadoo.be> wrote in message
news:bdv4h0$e4v$1@is.intellij.net...

Removing it wouldn't be a problem if there was another way to get the
same info,

>

but unfortunately,
- new Run configuration, and
- new JUnit configuration
do the same things - find the target class - in 2 different ways :

>
>

When creating a new Run configuration,
clicking on the ["..."] button next to the 'Main Class' opens a 'choose
Main Class dialog',
=> displays a list of all the valid candidate (Class with a main()

method).

It's appropriate, as most projects have only a few Main class.
I like this behaviour, especially when working on code I didn't write.

>

BTW, that's the same behaviour as "Menu.Run.Junit" : display a list of
all the possible candidate,
but it's missing from "New JUnit configuration" (see below)

>

When creating a new JUnit configuration,
clicking on the ["..."] button next to the class button opens a 2-tab
dialog, where you have to
- click-find (Tree-view) or
- search-find (Search by name)
a target class.

>
>

I'd suggest :
- remove Run.Junit Test, as you suggest

>

but
- uniformize the "new xxx configuration" ways of selecting/finding a
target class.

>

Way 1 : merge both ways => 3 tabs per dialog

>

Way 2 : enhance "search by name"
- to display all the possible candidates, when the value "*" is entered,
and
- display this choice by default, with the '*' text preselected

>
>

=> pressing in the dialog would display all the valid candidates
=> entering text would erase the '*' and be used for "Search by name"

>
>

Alain

>


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Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:

>On uniformization.
>Applications and tests are quite different:
>1. Usually you have a few mains and many-many tests (or no tests at all).

>
Agree.

>You have little chance to find test in list.
>
? what do you mean ?

>2. Test classes has different names when application classes tends to be
>named just Main. Search by name has no much sense.
>
I would say exactly the contrary : in my code, you would usually find
- only 1Main class
- a TestAll class in every package

>To find all tests in project you can
>-go to junit.framework.Test and search for usages and implementing classes.
>- Moreover you may inspect code for Unused declarations providing JUnit testcases as the only entry points and
>find not tested code (however, not all).
>
Or use the very simple
, J
the very feature you want to remove.

You're selling me a rope, Dmitry :)

Alain

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"Alain Ravet" <alain.ravet.list@wanadoo.be> wrote in message
news:bdv7cf$s5q$2@is.intellij.net...

Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:

>
>

>You have little chance to find test in list.
>
? what do you mean ?

>

I've just investigated how much time will it take me to find my test class
in list. I know the name and package. I've taken stopwatch in one hand and
mouse (I have no shortcut) in another and start. It takes me 20s to find it
in list. Then try Ctrl-N - less then 5s (including time to bring hands to
keyboard). The rest 15s is enought time to press Run and close editor.

>2. Test classes has different names when application classes tends to be
>named just Main. Search by name has no much sense.
>
I would say exactly the contrary : in my code, you would usually find
- only 1Main class
- a TestAll class in every package

>

>To find all tests in project you can
>-go to junit.framework.Test and search for usages and implementing

classes.

>- Moreover you may inspect code for Unused declarations providing JUnit

testcases as the only entry points and

>find not tested code (however, not all).
>
Or use the very simple
, J
the very feature you want to remove.


How ofter do you need to see all tests in a project and how much time do you
spend watching them?
I guess the answer on second question is "much more than 10s" (time you
waste to perform Find Usages).

>

You're selling me a rope, Dmitry :)

>
Well, do you see a way to improve this dialog?

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

"Develop with pleasure!"


0
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Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:


> You have little chance to find test in list.
and
> I've just investigated how much time will it take me to find
> my test class in list. .. 20s .. Then try Ctrl-N - less then 5s

Fine when you know the test class name, but when you don't - ex: code
you didn't write -, being able to shop around can be helpful..
..as it is for "New Run config" + "Choose Main class", where you know
the profile of what you need (a class with a main() method), but have no
idea where it's located.


> Well, do you see a way to improve this dialog?

As I said in a previous message, I believe uniformization of the 2
behaviours would help.

I think I prefer way 1 : 3 tabs
tab 1 : List
tab 2 : Search by name
tab 3 : Tree-view

, with a twist :
- When called from "New Run configuration" , open on tab 1
- When called from "New Junt configuration", open on tab 2
(=> default == current version behaviour)


Alain


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Toss it. :)

R
"Dmitry Peshehonov" <dyoma@intellij.com> wrote in message
news:bdv227$9ce$1@is.intellij.net...

Hi!

>

We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
run, and we'd like to drop it.
The reasons:
1. It's dialog is absolutely unusable if you have more than couple of test
classes.
2. There are much more usable ways to create test configuration.
3. It just exists so it needs to be supported (e.g.now we have temporary
configurations implemented and we have to decide should it produce

permanent

configuration or not).

>

So the question
Does anyone use this feature and why it is better than other ways (go to
Run/Debug Configurations dialog, or create from current context).

>

Well, we may leave it but we want to know what for?

>

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

>

"Develop with pleasure!"

>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink


Cool. Toss the Run|JUnit Tests... panel, and I'll move my multi-select tracker request to be against the Project Panel instead.

(With the new test runner, Multi-select in the project view would be very cool indeed. "Run all of the tests in the directory, except this long one, but don't bother to create a configuration". Very sweet.)

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I use this feature quite a bit. I tend to keep only a few JUnit test
configurations in there at any one time - the ones relevant to the area I'm
currently working on - and delete them when I stop needing them regularly.
This works really well for me: it makes it simple to find the test cases I'm
concerned with, without having to open an editor for them or search through
the project tree. I'd be quite sad to see it go!

Vil.

Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:

Hi!

We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
run, and we'd like to drop it.
The reasons:
1. It's dialog is absolutely unusable if you have more than couple of test
classes.
2. There are much more usable ways to create test configuration.
3. It just exists so it needs to be supported (e.g.now we have temporary
configurations implemented and we have to decide should it produce permanent
configuration or not).

So the question
Does anyone use this feature and why it is better than other ways (go to
Run/Debug Configurations dialog, or create from current context).

Well, we may leave it but we want to know what for?

--
Best regards,
Dmitry Peshehonov
JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com

"Develop with pleasure!"


--
Vilya Harvey
vilya.harvey@digitalsteps.com / digital steps /
(W) +44 (0)1483 469 480
(M) +44 (0)7816 678 457 http://www.digitalsteps.com/

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No, I use "Run/Debug Configurations" for tests that can be executed locally.

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Oops, I just realised my mistake. I was thinking about the JUnit Run/Debug
configurations tab. I'd never even noticed the Run > JUnit Tests item before
(I very rarely use the menus).

Vil.

Vilya Harvey wrote:

I use this feature quite a bit. I tend to keep only a few JUnit test
configurations in there at any one time - the ones relevant to the area
I'm currently working on - and delete them when I stop needing them
regularly. This works really well for me: it makes it simple to find the
test cases I'm concerned with, without having to open an editor for them
or search through the project tree. I'd be quite sad to see it go!

Vil.

Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:

>> Hi!
>>
>> We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
>> run, and we'd like to drop it.
>> The reasons:
>> 1. It's dialog is absolutely unusable if you have more than couple of
>> test
>> classes.
>> 2. There are much more usable ways to create test configuration.
>> 3. It just exists so it needs to be supported (e.g.now we have temporary
>> configurations implemented and we have to decide should it produce
>> permanent
>> configuration or not).
>>
>> So the question
>> Does anyone use this feature and why it is better than other ways (go to
>> Run/Debug Configurations dialog, or create from current context).
>>
>> Well, we may leave it but we want to know what for?
>>
>> --
>> Best regards,
>> Dmitry Peshehonov
>> JetBrains, Inc, http://www.intellij.com
>>
>> "Develop with pleasure!"
>>
>>


--
Vilya Harvey
vilya.harvey@digitalsteps.com / digital steps /
(W) +44 (0)1483 469 480
(M) +44 (0)7816 678 457 http://www.digitalsteps.com/

Disclaimer

This e-mail and any attachments may be confidential and/or legally
privileged. If you have received this email and you are not a named
addressee, please inform the sender at Digital Steps Ltd by phone on
+44 (0)1483 469 480 or by reply email and then delete the email from
your system. If you are not a named addressee you must not use,
disclose, distribute, copy, print or rely on this email. Although
Digital Steps Ltd routinely screens for viruses, addressees should
check this email and any attachments for viruses. Digital Steps Ltd
makes no representation or warranty as to the absence of viruses in this
email or any attachments.

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Dmitry Peshehonov wrote:

We have menu Run | JUnit Tests... which allow you to select test class to
run, and we'd like to drop it.


In my projects the tests are : "does it compile ?" so I don't use it
very often (:
maybe I should

0

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