Aurora feels like it is developed by a different team

I could not help to notice the difference in atmosphere between Ariadna and Aurora:

  • Multiple build a week vs multiple weeks between builds

  • JetBrains very active on intellij.net vs very few interaction

  • Almost all new requests were opened or rejected within the day vs hundred of requests are left submitted.


I am not sure if it is a good sign yet. I hope it isn't a sign of rigidity settling in the software. Like some of you responded in one of Thomas thread earlier you are more focused now on the things you are doing.
However as a committed user I can say that I have a lot less incentive to participate than before.
The feedback works both ways. By not engaging your users you miss the opportunity to have a constructive discussion and you run the chance of loosing their interest.

I haven't run any metrics but it definitively feel like there is less activity already, at least meaningful ones.

I understand that you cannot answer all of them in a meaningful way but the effort to open them will be the same now or after. By changing their state now you are giving feedback to your users that yes you have read it and no you do not think you can address it now but you will later. Why having a state Open it isn?t for that?
I suppose you do not intent on leaving hundreds of requests submitted. So it is the difference between a little slower pace now but meaningful feedback and dialog and knowing better where you are or a little faster with losing some of your users and potentially missing some important SCRs (I assume that since you do not open them you are not reading them).

Maybe it is also time to make the intellij.net more scaleable. You could quickly think of
1. Have the SCR categorized based on functional groups: refactoring, cvs, java editing,? You could focus on the ones that you are actively developing in.
2. Have a ranking of users. You could focus on the higher rank first.

As a final thought I will provide a concrete example why I believe it feels like a different team:
The CVS integration is been re-written but none of the VCS Open API requests have been opened/discussed and no discussion AT ALL has been going on on the subject. We have no feedback that you are already working with the knowledge of these requests and it isn?t for the lack of attempts. I know of 3 actively developed VCS plugins that you could leverage off of (p4, subversion, clearcase). To me it looks like the perfect opportunity to get some great feedback on your open API and explain your new direction.
(http://www.intellij.net/forums/thread.jsp?forum=23&thread=26260&tstart=0&trange=100 ).

I am sure you do not intent on raising a wall of silence between your users and yourself but as least to me it feels that way. Maybe the old way cannot work anymore. I could not really guess you handled requests before but it seems that anybody would monitor the forums and the tracker. Maybe you are growing too popular for this. You need a little more structure and dedicate some people time to keep in touch with your user community. As usual rigidity isn?t just in the software. It is also in the organization.

A dedicated IDEA oldtimer.


72 comments

haha actually 4-7 is 3, 7-11 is 4, then 2 (At least in the second one), so maybe it's like a secret eXtreme programming numbering system for optimized release cycles. Maybe we should keep track of the numbers and come up with a graph showing possible patterns and see if we can determine when the next version will be. Then JetBrains will kick into the game, and start throwing us off by releasing more often to hide the secret curve...

maybe I just need more work to do...

R

0

Here is the real data on EAP build frequency:
First 1 1/2 month of Ariadna: 4.5days, Aurora: 9days
Ariadna overall build frequency: 4.5 days (4 if you discount their break in June). Aurora started at 7days and slowly went up to 14days for 813 (7,7,6,11,14).
It is 21days to date that 813 has been released.

And yes Robert, it seems that I am one of these pathetic souls (or soles?) that would just wander around, doing mischief if is wasn't for JetBrains.
In fact I think JetBrains is a force of good and peace. It keeps problem makers out of the streets, somehow turn them into doing things somewhat constructive and finally stimulates the internet backbone economy with all this pointless messages... ;)

0

hahah sweet! Is there some kind of group I can sign up to to start my wandering and get off the streets too? Seems everyone is inside playing with JetBrains. I too feel like I should contribute more to the internet super highway economy.

0

Right! It is completely unacceptable! That is the last time you are taking vacation, Mister CTO! In fact you cannot sleep anymore and you have to buy one of these wearable PC, a pager, a satellite phone so we can reach anytime... ;)
It occurs to me that I sound like my wife. Scary Eugene.

However on a more serious note, telling us that JetBrains is going in vacation and that things are going to be slow for a 2 weeks is the kind of feedback that would make us feel more part of the team, less frustrated (some of us are waiting for these builds like a junkie waits for his fix) and that would definitively not let loose canons like us go off in a flame war ;)

0

Are you serious?
CNN used satellite phones back in the first Iraq war. It's a phone with an attached satellite dish that send directly to a satellite which again sends back to earth where your connection is established.
With this you can phone to anyone even if you are on a trip in the Sahara, where a normal mobile phone won't get a connection.

To add something to the real topic of this thread:
Guys don't get yourself heated up. It's always the same game: When they'll ready, they'll give us a new EAP. Probably they are working on one of those bigger features (GUI Builder ?) and want to get this to some state where it can be used. And they don't want to risc a flood of the "#xxx unuseable" posts.

Well, I also cannot wait to get something new to play with, but there's nothing else we can do but wait. Accusing them of having a new (worse) team working on IDEA while the old gurus are doing some other business, generates a sort of doomsday atmosphere.

0

Bezug: Deine Nachricht vom 07.Mai.2003 12:05:

What's a satellite phone?


An "extended" version of a cell phone that works at virtually any place
on this planet. It uses a satellite link instead of all those base
stations that Verizon and AT&T put up all over America. Or did I just
miss your joke?

Dirk Dittert

0

I was KIDDING!!! Geez! hahahahaha

0

Bezug: Deine Nachricht vom 07.Mai.2003 12:35:

I was KIDDING!!! Geez! hahahahaha


Dude, I knew you were setting a trap for me ;)

Dirk

0

They are probably going to announce that they have been bought out by IBM, Microsoft (C#), or Borland

0

Dear all,

First of all, let me apologize if we've done something to create an
impression of rigidity.
We have been witnessing a lot of various changes both in the community and
internally over the last two years. The community has grown in its size,
the team became larger as well, the product became very complex. Often we
get too many requests, often we are focused on the things we do more than
everything else.

For the last few weeks we've been changing a lot of things at the core which
make the product itself quite "shaky" even for our internal use. For
example, the project file format has changed a lot, we don't have any
converters from the old projects, etc, so releasing it right away would
cause a lot of problems for everyone (see below).

However, we realized ourselves that delaying builds gets us in a situation
when we cannot really fix a lot of problems reported because a lot of them
are obsolete already because we changed a lot since that released version.
Publishing builds too often does not do any good either, since we get too
much feedback. So we would not mind getting builds out more often but we
require some support from you too. I will explain it later.

After a discussion here today we decided to try to revive the good old
atmosphere of the EAP, but we need some things from the members as well.
We will be working on defining a policy for the EAP usage and publishing it
on ITN. Before that, I will try to explain something in a free form.

-


Submitted requests
-



Every day there's one person from the team responsible for going through all
submitted requests and assigning them to a particular developer who's most
likely responsible for the problem. Developers then review their submitted
requests and decide what to do with them. In case they cannot guess what's
going on, they do not set request's state as "open", however they still have
it assigned so it's tracked by the developer. Basically when the request is
"open", it means that the problem is localized and it's already planned to
fix it. When it's assigned but not open, it is postponed until the
developer gets some time to look into it in more detail. There can be
various reasons of postponed requests, like it's a duplicate of some other
request, it's impossible to say by looking at the exception what's going on,
etc.

Now to the problem. Our public interface to the tracker does not show
assigned developers for requests. So you might see your submitted request
there for a long time, but it does not mean it's not taken care of, it's
there because we are not fixed on whether it's a real problem or a noise.
Our internal planning relies a lot on the requests in tracker, so having
thousands of requests open would make planning impossible.

We thought of opening the assigned developer field to everyone, but this has
one effect that people will try to email developers directly which we don't
really want to have as a general practice.

-


What we will do
-



1) We will publish a weekly newsletter of what's going on in the team
2) We'll try to be more responsive on the newsgroups
3) We will target the 2 builds a week schedule

-


About EAP membership
-



EAP itself is a preview of what we do. It's aimed at collecting opinions on
what we are doing so you get what you want in the end. We do not guarantee
that each build works, however we strive to have it. It's not a beta
program where everything is supposed to work and look as in the released
version - you participate in the evolution of the software from the ground
up.
Having a lot of people complaining that this build is unusable makes us
delay the builds, because we want to make it usable. If you agree to get
the bleeding-edge thing, then please don't complain. It's enough to notify
us once that something is broken.

We don't expect you to be testers, but it's going to be so anyway. Most
likely you will test the things you submitted yourselves. IDEA is a
professional development tool, you use it every day, so since all of us are
developers basically we are testing it by doing our usual everyday work.

We don't expect you to thank us for giving this great opportunity to
participate in the EAP, rather the opposite. We get plenty of good things
from you and we are greatful for that. The whole idea of EAP was meant to
be organized as a two-way collaboration tool for the good of everyone.

We don't usually do regular support in the EAP. If you are interested in
basic things like how to set up a web app, please contact our support people
at http://www.intellij.net/websupport. If you are bringing the problem that
setting up web apps is hard to use and maybe even can provide some solution,
then let's discuss it here.

That's basically it for the most part. Most likely, other team members will
add their own comments and additions to what I said.

P.S. I absolutely support the idea of improving ITN and rating of users. We
are working on it.

--
Eugene Belyaev, CTO
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"




"Jacques Morel" <jacmorel@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:21445166.1052235799958.JavaMail.javamailuser@localhost...

I could not help to notice the difference in atmosphere between Ariadna

and Aurora:

  • Multiple build a week vs multiple weeks between builds

  • JetBrains very active on intellij.net vs very few interaction

  • Almost all new requests were opened or rejected within the day vs

hundred of requests are left submitted.
>

I am not sure if it is a good sign yet. I hope it isn't a sign of rigidity

settling in the software. Like some of you responded in one of Thomas thread
earlier you are more focused now on the things you are doing.

However as a committed user I can say that I have a lot less incentive to

participate than before.

The feedback works both ways. By not engaging your users you miss the

opportunity to have a constructive discussion and you run the chance of
loosing their interest.
>

I haven't run any metrics but it definitively feel like there is less

activity already, at least meaningful ones.
>

I understand that you cannot answer all of them in a meaningful way but

the effort to open them will be the same now or after. By changing their
state now you are giving feedback to your users that yes you have read it
and no you do not think you can address it now but you will later. Why
having a state Open it isn?t for that?

I suppose you do not intent on leaving hundreds of requests submitted. So

it is the difference between a little slower pace now but meaningful
feedback and dialog and knowing better where you are or a little faster with
losing some of your users and potentially missing some important SCRs (I
assume that since you do not open them you are not reading them).
>

Maybe it is also time to make the intellij.net more scaleable. You could

quickly think of

1. Have the SCR categorized based on functional groups: refactoring, cvs,

java editing,? You could focus on the ones that you are actively developing
in.

2. Have a ranking of users. You could focus on the higher rank first.

>

As a final thought I will provide a concrete example why I believe it

feels like a different team:

The CVS integration is been re-written but none of the VCS Open API

requests have been opened/discussed and no discussion AT ALL has been going
on on the subject. We have no feedback that you are already working with the
knowledge of these requests and it isn?t for the lack of attempts. I know of
3 actively developed VCS plugins that you could leverage off of (p4,
subversion, clearcase). To me it looks like the perfect opportunity to get
some great feedback on your open API and explain your new direction.
>
(http://www.intellij.net/forums/thread.jsp?forum=23&thread=26260&tstart=0&tr
ange=100 ).
>

I am sure you do not intent on raising a wall of silence between your

users and yourself but as least to me it feels that way. Maybe the old way
cannot work anymore. I could not really guess you handled requests before
but it seems that anybody would monitor the forums and the tracker. Maybe
you are growing too popular for this. You need a little more structure and
dedicate some people time to keep in touch with your user community. As
usual rigidity isn?t just in the software. It is also in the organization.
>

A dedicated IDEA oldtimer.

>
>
>


0

Oh that would explain why it feels like a different team. They have already relocated the team to Redmond, fire the developers that would not move and use aliases on intellij.net to not make us freak out ;)

0

Great to hear from you. I think we all hear what you are saying. We have all been in the same situation with the products we create and support. My 2 cents is this

1. Create an unmoderated forum like it currently is for the community to interact with each other, no jetbrain interaction guarenteed.


2. Create moderated forums that jetbrains uses for bugs, feature requests and general on topic discussions.

I would even say that you could probably get groups of us to do the moderation for you. This would filter out a lot of the noise, which would decrease your response time back to us.

What do you think?

0

Eugene Belyaev wrote:

Now to the problem. Our public interface to the tracker does not show
assigned developers for requests. So you might see your submitted request
there for a long time, but it does not mean it's not taken care of, it's
there because we are not fixed on whether it's a real problem or a noise.
Our internal planning relies a lot on the requests in tracker, so having
thousands of requests open would make planning impossible.


Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between Submitted and Open:
Assigned. It doesn't have to say who it's assigned to, but it just
indicates that the request has been looked at and someone has taken
responsibility for it.

1) We will publish a weekly newsletter of what's going on in the team


Excellent!

We don't expect you to thank us for giving this great opportunity to
participate in the EAP, rather the opposite. We get plenty of good things
from you and we are greatful for that. The whole idea of EAP was meant to
be organized as a two-way collaboration tool for the good of everyone.


Personally, I'm gratified to be involved with such an open-minded group
of developers. Too often, the development team for a product is an
amorphous blob sequestered in the dark bowels of the earth from which
product releases are occasionally excreted. It's nice to have a human to
speak to ;)

We don't usually do regular support in the EAP. If you are interested in
basic things like how to set up a web app, please contact our support people
at http://www.intellij.net/websupport. If you are bringing the problem that
setting up web apps is hard to use and maybe even can provide some solution,
then let's discuss it here.


Is there any form of official support for 3rd-party plugin developers?

Ciao,
Gordon

--
Gordon Tyler (Software Developer)
Quest Software <http://java.quest.com/>
260 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4L5, Canada
Voice: 416-643-4846 | Fax: 416-594-1919

0

Is there any form of official support for 3rd-party plugin developers?


Currently there's only support for companies integrating their product with
IDEA. We are working on providing it for everyone.

--
Eugene Belyaev, CTO
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



"Gordon Tyler" <gordon.tyler@sitraka.com> wrote in message
news:b9bogc$318$1@is.intellij.net...

Eugene Belyaev wrote:

Now to the problem. Our public interface to the tracker does not show
assigned developers for requests. So you might see your submitted

request

there for a long time, but it does not mean it's not taken care of, it's
there because we are not fixed on whether it's a real problem or a

noise.

Our internal planning relies a lot on the requests in tracker, so having
thousands of requests open would make planning impossible.

>

Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between Submitted and Open:
Assigned. It doesn't have to say who it's assigned to, but it just
indicates that the request has been looked at and someone has taken
responsibility for it.

>

1) We will publish a weekly newsletter of what's going on in the team

>

Excellent!

>

We don't expect you to thank us for giving this great opportunity to
participate in the EAP, rather the opposite. We get plenty of good

things

from you and we are greatful for that. The whole idea of EAP was meant

to

be organized as a two-way collaboration tool for the good of everyone.

>

Personally, I'm gratified to be involved with such an open-minded group
of developers. Too often, the development team for a product is an
amorphous blob sequestered in the dark bowels of the earth from which
product releases are occasionally excreted. It's nice to have a human to
speak to ;)

>

We don't usually do regular support in the EAP. If you are interested

in

basic things like how to set up a web app, please contact our support

people

at http://www.intellij.net/websupport. If you are bringing the problem

that

setting up web apps is hard to use and maybe even can provide some

solution,

then let's discuss it here.

>

Is there any form of official support for 3rd-party plugin developers?

>

Ciao,
Gordon

>

--
Gordon Tyler (Software Developer)
Quest Software <http://java.quest.com/>
260 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4L5, Canada
Voice: 416-643-4846 | Fax: 416-594-1919

>


0

Gordon Tyler wrote:

Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between Submitted and Open:
Assigned.


Sounds like an excellent idea, and I think this would help a lot since
it would confirm that someone has actually looked at the issue -- if it
has been assigned to someone, it hasn't been ignored.

0

Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between
Submitted and Open:
Assigned. It doesn't have to say who it's assigned
to, but it just
indicates that the request has been looked at and
someone has taken
responsibility for it.


+1 That would definitely curb down complaints!

Personally, I'm gratified to be involved with such an
open-minded group
of developers. Too often, the development team for a
product is an
amorphous blob sequestered in the dark bowels of the
earth from which
product releases are occasionally excreted. It's nice
to have a human to
speak to ;)


You don't have a high opinion of software development, do you? ;)

The guys are IntelliJ set the bar very high for themselves and we're getting used to them delivering! We're spoiled, that's what we are! :)

Best,
Chris

0

Eugene Belyaev wrote:
>>Is there any form of official support for 3rd-party plugin developers?


Currently there's only support for companies integrating their product with
IDEA. We are working on providing it for everyone.


The plugin I'm developing is for internal use to help manage i18n of our
product, PerformaSure. Does this qualify for "official" plugin developer
support?

Thanks,
Gordon

--
Gordon Tyler (Software Developer)
Quest Software <http://java.quest.com/>
260 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4L5, Canada
Voice: 416-643-4846 | Fax: 416-594-1919

0

On Wed, 07 May 2003 16:02:32 +0000, Jacques Morel wrote:

Right! It is completely unacceptable! That is the last time you are taking
vacation, Mister CTO! In fact you cannot sleep anymore and you have to buy
one of these wearable PC, a pager, a satellite phone so we can reach
anytime... ;) It occurs to me that I sound like my wife. Scary Eugene.


Of course- I can't see what you're all complaining about - saying no one
at intellij.com is replying - why - the admin of the jive site is busy
writing messages all day and night! He's even suffering split
personality disorder - just look at the all the posts from
jiveadmin@intellij.com with a different signed name. Poor fellow, maybe
we should pitch in and get him some medication.

--
...turn to the light - don't be frightened by the shadows it creates,
...turn to the light - turning away could be a terrible mistake
...dream theater - the great debate


0

+1

I filed a request: http://www.intellij.net/tracker/itn/viewSCR?publicId=579

Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between
Submitted and Open:
Assigned. It doesn't have to say who it's assigned
to, but it just
indicates that the request has been looked at and
someone has taken
responsibility for it.

0

Another state would be ideal but like I was proposing the act of opening the SCR is enough:
Submitted => not reviewed by JetBrains
Opened => reviewed by JetBrains
Opened with "fixed in" set => reviewed and slated for development

0

As always one step ahead. It is wonderful news.

You rock!

0

+1 on the Assigned status. No need to tell us to whom. If it goes from Assigned to Open, then we know the person it's assigned to has figured out what's wrong.

0

Hm, interesting. So should those of us working for/with other companies on integration plugins hassle one of you guys directly? Is there a formalised process for this?

0

Eugene Belyaev wrote:

For the last few weeks we've been changing a lot of things at the core which
make the product itself quite "shaky" even for our internal use.


I'm sure all of us understand that these things must happen and that it
isn't possible to always change things gradually but you must take a few
weeks or even more to let things settle down.

The newsletter is an excellent idea -- or just an informal note now and
then about what you're doing. I think if you just sent a simple message
saying "we're working on the new project structure, so there will
probably be at least two weeks until the next build", people would have
been much less frustrated waiting for the next build and we would all
have felt more involved in some sense since we knew what was going on.

Every day there's one person from the team responsible for going through all
submitted requests and assigning them to a particular developer who's most
likely responsible for the problem.


This is also very good to know. I had thought that those bugs that
remained in the submitted state were bugs that no developer had yet
"claimed" or reviewed thoroughly, and I can imagine it's quite
frustrating when you go through the process of reporting a bug and it
seems like it is more or less ignored, even if I know you have too much
to do to deal with it right away.

Another such problem is when we try to help the team by reporting
duplicate bugs, or bugs that have already been fixed, and there is no
response whatsoever for several months. For example, one of the oldest
tracker requests, #357, was submitted in July 2001. In October 2002 I
commented that it seemed to be fixed, and in December I posted a
reminder. Still no comment and the bug remains open. Sometimes there's
a quick response, but often there isn't, which makes me feel I'm wasting
my time when I'm trying to help reduce the bug list and the workload on
the developers. Now I'm mostly ignoring duplicates even when I remember
I've probably seen something similar before. I hope it doesn't sound
like I'm whining here -- naturally it's up to you how to prioritize your
work, it's just that I also change my priorities depending on the
response I get and I won't spend time on something like this if it
doesn't seem like the IntelliJ developers think it's useful.

EAP itself is a preview of what we do. It's aimed at collecting opinions on
what we are doing so you get what you want in the end. We do not guarantee
that each build works, however we strive to have it. It's not a beta
program where everything is supposed to work and look as in the released
version - you participate in the evolution of the software from the ground
up.
Having a lot of people complaining that this build is unusable makes us
delay the builds, because we want to make it usable. If you agree to get
the bleeding-edge thing, then please don't complain. It's enough to notify
us once that something is broken.


Perhaps something like this should be stated more clearly and strongly
on the download page, or maybe even in a popup when you start IDEA. It
does say that " JetBrains, Inc. DOES NOT GUARANTEE THAT THIS SOFTWARE
WILL RUN TROUBLE-FREE" but I think this is much too weak. People are
getting used to this kind of statement being part of even stable
released software. You need to say that there some things WILL NOT work
and there WILL be crashes and bugs.

I've been beta-testing a media player (name removed since I don't want
to be accused of advertising) where the first few versions had this on
the download page:

IMPORTANT-- This is only a preview -- some things don't work, some
things crash, and your data may not be safe. Don't use this preview with
files that can't be replaced. If you don't consider yourself an expert
with *****, please wait for a later release. Backup your database (and
files) before doing anything else.

Later on, when it was becoming more stable, we got a less drastic
statement: "This is beta software -- some things don't work, some
things may crash, and your database and tags may not be totally safe."

Even later, "Many things will crash and not work. If that worries you,
please wait for a couple of weeks." No statement about the music
database since that was considered stable and safe.

Personally I think these statements were an excellent guide. Maybe your
marketing department would think otherwise (saying that your program
will crash).

In any case, thank you for shedding some more light (is that the right
expression?) on what's been going on with IntelliJ!

0

+1 Great idea.

Perhaps there could be an intermediate state between Submitted and Open:
Assigned. It doesn't have to say who it's assigned to, but it just
indicates that the request has been looked at and someone has taken
responsibility for it.



0

Another such problem is when we try to help the team
by reporting
duplicate bugs, or bugs that have already been fixed,
and there is no
response whatsoever for several months. For example,
one of the oldest
tracker requests, #357, was submitted in July 2001.
In October 2002 I
commented that it seemed to be fixed, and in December
I posted a
reminder. Still no comment and the bug remains open.
Sometimes there's
a quick response, but often there isn't, which makes
me feel I'm wasting
my time when I'm trying to help reduce the bug list
and the workload on
the developers. Now I'm mostly ignoring duplicates
even when I remember
I've probably seen something similar before. I hope
it doesn't sound
like I'm whining here -- naturally it's up to you how
to prioritize your
work, it's just that I also change my priorities
depending on the
response I get and I won't spend time on something
like this if it
doesn't seem like the IntelliJ developers think it's
useful.


I understand your pain! I spent quite some time marking bugs as duplicates when I think they are: meaning I first have to find the bug that I was reminded of and then file a report in the newer bug. This takes time and it is frustrating when the bug stays open.

Maybe there should be an easier way to mark a bug as a duplicate instead of posting a comment? Like a button that would notify the assigned developer that someone reported the bug as a duplicate, allowing the user to enter a bug number (which would then be used to create an hyperlink for the developer to visit instead of having to hunt down the bug)?

Closing bugs when they are duplicate would surely help reduce IntelliJ's amount of work...

Best,
Chris

0

-----------------
What we will do
-----------------

>

1) We will publish a weekly newsletter of what's going on in the team
2) We'll try to be more responsive on the newsgroups
3) We will target the 2 builds a week schedule

>

I can't help but salute these initiatives. While we all understand that
certain changes might take a little longer to implement, having long release
cycles without being given a clue about what's happening (and I'm quite sure
a lot of us felt like being left in the dark lately) tends to diminish the
enthusiasm this community is fueled by.

I'm among the ones who would vote for shorter release cycles (if we had to
vote for it, that is, I'm quite glad with your decisions). Having IDEA crash
on me seems quite bearable if I know I can wait a next release one of the
following days (even though not all the problems will be fixed, even though
new problems will pop-up). Knowing I have to wait weeks before a version
fixing the problems would be published, quite frankly tempts me to go back
on Ariadna and wait. After two weeks, I'm not even motivated to fill in bug
reports anymore (sure there's somebody else that reported the problem, it
might even be fixed already; but no, I won't start searching through those
tons of reported bugs or those 150 fixed problems to see if one of them
looks familiar, I'll just wait).

I'm really looking forward to the dynamism this community used to have back
in the Ariadna days.
Andrei


0

There is no formal process, just email our support and we'll sort it out.

--

Eugene Belyaev, CTO
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



"Hani Suleiman" <hani@formicary.net> wrote in message
news:30970510.1052339997110.JavaMail.javamailuser@localhost...

Hm, interesting. So should those of us working for/with other companies on

integration plugins hassle one of you guys directly? Is there a formalised
process for this?


0

What are we talking about here?

  • Dedicated help on the OpenAPI and SemiOpenAPI (PSI)

  • Ability to push feature request/bug fixes priority up


Are you also only targeting third party integration or could this apply to other plugins as well?

Jacques

0

Please sign in to leave a comment.