no remote debugging without local application server?

hello,

in Idea 6.0 is the following, especially the bold part, correct? It seems so unlikely.

Assuming that Tomcat is not installed locally, adding a configuration in "Run/Debug Configurations" for Tomcat/Remote will not show anything suitable in the "Application Server" dropdown. In that case, "configure" has to be used to add a local Tomcat, which has to be installed just to satisfy that dialog (which is being opened using "configure" in "Run/Debug Configurations"). After closing that dialog Tomcat can be uninstalled. (It does not matter that the resulting Tomcat configuration is invalid; that results in a warning only and remote debugging works. Only when there is no application server chosen at all, rather than a broken one, debugging is impossible because all corresponding menu items and buttons are grey and the key combinations have no effect then.)

Conan

3 comments

You're absolutely right, the application server to which you want to connect remotely must also be installed locally.

While this may seem somewhat strange in the case of Tomcat, it is of immense importance for any other application server. The reason is that in order to communicate with the remote application server some application server specific libraries are needed. And it's exactly those libraries which are taken from the local installation.

In the case of Tomcat it's sheer luck that nothing from the local installation is used anymore once the run configuration has been stored.

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Alternatively, you can setup an ordinary "Remote" run configuration and attach to any java VM (including the one running Tomcat).
Tomcat-specific configuration is needed mostly for JSP source-level debugging. If you don't need it, you can use simplier "Remote"
run configuration.

--
Best regards,
Eugene Zhuravlev
Software Developer
JetBrains Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

"Martin Fuhrer" <mf@fuhrer.com> wrote in message news:9692541.1161538023042.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

You're absolutely right, the application server to which you want to connect remotely must also be installed locally.

>

While this may seem somewhat strange in the case of Tomcat, it is of immense importance for any other application server. The
reason is that in order to communicate with the remote application server some application server specific libraries are needed.
And it's exactly those libraries which are taken from the local installation.

>

In the case of Tomcat it's sheer luck that nothing from the local installation is used anymore once the run configuration has been
stored.



0

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