Who is using Maven?

My boss got hyped by some marketing droids about how wonderful maven is.
(They are trying to sell Polarion, a "Unified Software Development Platform", which favors Maven.)
I have been looking at Maven for a couple of hours and I'm not convinced at all. It's so much like "just write a couple of idiosyncratic xml configuration files" and voila, a hello world will compile automatically. Wow, big deal. Now consider our current main project which uses ant filter tokens, obfuscation, some dozen external jars, InstallAnywhere, etc. I guess I'll end up with many dozens of stupid configuration files and would have to bend standard maven a lot to get it to run...

So:
How many of you are really using Maven?
Do you think it will replace ant anytime soon for real world projects?

4 comments
Comment actions Permalink

Stephen Kelvin wrote:

My boss got hyped by some marketing droids about how wonderful maven is.
(They are trying to sell Polarion, a "Unified Software Development Platform", which favors Maven.)
I have been looking at Maven for a couple of hours and I'm not convinced at all. It's so much like "just write a couple of idiosyncratic xml configuration files" and voila, a hello world will compile automatically. Wow, big deal. Now consider our current main project which uses ant filter tokens, obfuscation, some dozen external jars, InstallAnywhere, etc. I guess I'll end up with many dozens of stupid configuration files and would have to bend standard maven a lot to get it to run...

So:
How many of you are really using Maven?
Do you think it will replace ant anytime soon for real world projects?


No, you are making the same mistake as most people.

Maven does not replace ant. Maven is built on ant, uses ant, extends
ant, stands on the shoulders of ant.

Maven is a higher level tool than ant, that helps you structure your
software projects and their artifacts.

You can more or less just use your complex ant tags in maven, with
minimal changes.

Yes, i use maven, and i'd like it if IDEA supported it the same way it
supports ant, and perhaps more.

/Kreiger



Attachment(s):
signature.asc
0
Comment actions Permalink

In article <15616633.1113925525559.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net>,
Stephen Kelvin <mail@gremlin.info> wrote:

I have been looking at Maven for a couple of hours and I'm not convinced at
all. It's so much like "just write a couple of idiosyncratic xml
configuration files" and voila, a hello world will compile automatically.


We found that Maven added very little to our process, at the cost of a
lot of configuration.

Admittedly, we had a fairly ideosyncratic build system based on ANT and
some templates. Were I doing it now, I would generate seperate builds
for each project, and have the overall project integration build be a
complete seperate beast. I would probably generate the integration
build via some Java, rather than template matching, as then it becomes
easy to write parallel sections.

Thus - unless Maven buys you a lot, roll your own. If it does, be aware
of just what it is buying you. This makes it really easy to sell
developers on the extra cost.

(Our process, for example, included autogenerated IDEA projects. Were
it possible to generate an Eclipse workspace without launching Eclipse,
we would have those too.)

Scott

0
Comment actions Permalink

I've seen Maven used on a number of projects, and I'm yet to be convinced.

It has the feel of an application that was built by several people, none of whom were on speaking terms at the time.

Configuration seems to be spread over several different files (both .xml and .properties) and your project has to agreer with their idea of good structure; otherwise you will have a hell of a job getting it to work.

Wow. Someone asking for an opinion on Mavan, and no sign of Hani??!!

0
Comment actions Permalink


We are using Maven in a real world project, and it works well for us. We actually switched from Ant to Maven to avoid having to maintain our scripts.

It does not replace Ant. It is built on Ant, and to some extent, it hides it.

Maven provides a ready-to-use build environment that should suit many projects. I see Maven as an effort to define standard Ant builds so that they can be reused, instead of having each project redefine scripts doing the same things.

Even those who don't like Ant should admit that the project site generation is well done.

Maybe if there was an open-source project with ready-to-use Ant build templates, Maven would have never existed.

If you accept some rules it mandates (organisation of files, one artifact per project), it greatly speeds you up, especially if you don't know Ant.

But if you are an Ant expert and already have a set of build files you are happy with, then you won't probably find Maven useful. Actually, time would probably be more wisely invested in adding features in your product.

Cheers,

J-F

0

Please sign in to leave a comment.