[ANN] IntelliUML Teresa 1.4

Beto Software announces the release of IntelliUML Teresa 1.4.

New features:
- Diagram Navigator.
- Zoom.
- Align/arrange diagram nodes.
- Show/hide grid.
- Snap to grid.
- Grid settings: set background/foreground color and spacing.
- Drag and drop classes/interfaces to Diagram Editor from Model Explorer.
- Improved printing
- Hand tool.

Download available at http://www.betosoftware.com/teresa/download.html or from IntelliJ IDEA Plugin Manager.

-The IntelliUML Teresa Team
Beto Software, S.L.
http://www.betosoftware.com/

12 comments
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I installed this tool but I get an error saying it's "already registered" when I click the "Start" menu option for Teresa. If I configure it to start automatically when a project is opened, it simply gives a NPE. Does this tool not support IntelliJ 5.01?


Unfortunately, the blame window doesn't let you copy the text to the clipboard otherwise I'd paste the full stack trace.

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IntelliUML Teresa 1.4 works only with IDEA 4.5.x - a new version for IDEA 5 will be released by the end of September.

-The IntelliUML Teresa Team
Beto Software, S.L.
http://www.betosoftware.com/

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Will that version support Java 1.5? There seems to be a serious lack of affordable modeling tools that support 1.5 even though it's been out for almost a year now...

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The new Java 1.5 language features won't be supported by that version. It's in our backlog with no target date yet.

-The IntelliUML Teresa Team
Beto Software, S.L.
http://www.betosoftware.com/

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Just curious...why such a long lag time? I've been evaluating a lot of modeling tools lately and this is a very common problem. About the only tools that support 1.5 are the very pricey ones like Together/J, MagicDraw, etc. The bulk of the modeling tools do not support it. I'm just trying to figure out why this is. I find it very curious that something that was specced it two years ago, released almost a year ago, is not supported. Do modeling companies, such as yourself, simply don't think that people are using 1.5? Because I am, and any modeling tool that doesn't support 1.5 is worthless to me. It also makes me worry that when new versions of Java are released it will be two years before there's an upgrade to the modeling tool I buy to support it.

Now I wouldn't necessarily be surprised or even upset if there wasn't full support. For example, if a modeling tool could reverse engineer my code and understand it fine but it may not be able to generate everything in a 1.5 way until a later date that would be ok.

Sorry, I'm not picking on your company specifically because it's very common. This is really just a general question.

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I can speak for my company only and for us it's just a matter of priorities.

-The IntelliUML Teresa Team
Beto Software, S.L.
http://www.betosoftware.com/

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Maybe I'll try a general answer:

  • Unfortunately the release of Java 5 coincided with the finalization of UML 2.0.

UML 2.0 represents a major change to the meta model, it changes the way almost every
diagram is represented, adds some new diagrams and a lot of new features.
Worse than that the specification is several years late, vague, incomplete and a
nightmare to implement.

  • Java 5 affects UML modeling in a whole bunch of areas: Code import must use a new

parser, Java generics must be mapped to UML templates (which is very tricky if precise
Java semantics should be maintained), enums must be mapped correctly, etc.
Implementing only parts of this is not really feasible. What good is generics support
if you cannot import code that contains enums or cannot represent the type arguments
in the diagram?

All in all, I think most tools will have more or less complete UML 2.0 support by
the end of the year and Java 5 support is the next big thing after that.

Of course the big companies with lots of manpower can tackle both areas simultaneously.


Marc Stock wrote:

Just curious...why such a long lag time? I've been evaluating a lot of modeling tools lately and this is a very common problem. About the only tools that support 1.5 are the very pricey ones like Together/J, MagicDraw, etc. The bulk of the modeling tools do not support it. I'm just trying to figure out why this is. I find it very curious that something that was specced it two years ago, released almost a year ago, is not supported. Do modeling companies, such as yourself, simply don't think that people are using 1.5? Because I am, and any modeling tool that doesn't support 1.5 is worthless to me. It also makes me worry that when new versions of Java are released it will be two years before there's an upgrade to the modeling tool I buy to support it.

Now I wouldn't necessarily be surprised or even upset if there wasn't full support. For example, if a modeling tool could reverse engineer my code and understand it fine but it may not be able to generate everything in a 1.5 way until a later date that would be ok.

Sorry, I'm not picking on your company specifically because it's very common. This is really just a general question.

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So the vendors get to choose between not supporting new diagrams and annotations or not supporting an entire language? Interesting.

Thanks for the background info.

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You have to remember that most UML tool vendors and their clients are primarily concerned with UML, thus I believe the diagram update is rightfully more important than the language since UML is not language specific.

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You're right. I have a very different view on this because I'm a programmer and I don't sit there playing with diagrams all day. As a consultant, I like modeling tools that allow me to go in and reverse engineer code into a class diagram and also allow me to generate sequence diagrams from any given point because that kind of stuff helps me get up to speed on an existing codebase much quicker. I don't care about forward engineering. On occasion I might create a diagram just to clarify an idea in my head but I find extensive diagramming wasteful and pointless. So, yes I probably see this from a very different viewpoint than most modeling tool users. Unfortunately, no tool seems to address this type of user.

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Ah, there's your problem. You're trying to use UML as a tool to get productive work accomplished, rather than as a tool to avoid getting productive work accomplished. Common mistake.

BTW, this misunderstanding also explains the price-points of most modeling tools. Tools that actually get productive work accomplished (e.g. IDEA) have to justify their costs based on how productive they make you. Tools that provide the appearance of productive work while actually managing to avoid it are, to a certain class of user, absolutely priceless. That's why the highest category of UML tools, which allow you to generate and maintain code with only about twenty times the effort necessary to write and maintain code, command price points about twenty times what IDEA does.

--Dave Griffith

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I do agree with you, like you I'm a programmer and for me the only use for UML is to clarify my point to people that love to look at pretty pictures (i.e. line managers etc) through reverse-engineering (I never use it the other way around). I vary rarely find developers using it among other developers (though I know they do exist).

The other way it can be useful is if somebody is passing me a design spec, but with that said in my experience the person producing the spec doesn't usually have any real clue about how it really should hang together behind the scenes so I wind up re-writing it regardless.

However as I said before, for UML tool vendors its the pretty pictures that are their bread and butter which is why they have to be kept up-to-date ahead of languages.

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