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I would agree with Carlos... strange that you chose a 3 year old posting about IDEA v7 roadmap to post your comments rather than starting a new thread... Anyhow, my input on your comments about IDEA's cons...

1) Complicated numbered bookmarks

Fixed in the EAP build 94.273 that was just released today. CTRL+SHIFT+# sets a numbered bookmark, CRTL+# goes to it. This is the way it use to be in IDEA 1(?)-8. But it was removed in 9. It's back now (in the current EAP build and will be in the 9.0.2 release) Plus you still have the mnemonic bookmarks available via CTRL+F11 and SHIFT+F11 I personally find these very useful.

2) Inability to disable structure view for some actions (like Go to type)

Not sure what you mean by this. Can you elaborate?

3) Hard to work with very large files if the structure view is disabled

I think that's a matter of opinion. I've never found it difficult to work with large files. Especially once you get to know all the navigation shortcuts there are.

4) File structure popup does not search in the fields of the inner classes.

It can. It might be a bit unintuitive in the way you do it. You first need to select the inner class. Then you can search its members. So if you have an Inner class named MyInnerClass, you would:

  1) Type CTRL+F12 to open the File Structure Popup

  2) Start typing the name of you inner class until it is found, then hit enter to select it. For example "My[ENTER]

  3) you will then see a list of the members of the inner class. Just start typing the name of the member you want to go to.

You could argue that this is a "bad" way to do it. I could just as easily argue that it is a good way as it keeps the file structure popup from becoming too crowded. Plus it solves the issue where you have multiple inner classes that all have the same method as is common when working in Swing. Either way, it is the way it works and it is workable.

5) Lack of perspectives

This being a con is truly a matter of opinion. I know Eclipse users that hate perspectives in Eclipse. I know Eclipse users that love them. The little I've used Eclipse, I don't care for them. And I've never missed them in IDEA. But I'm not an Eclipse transplant, so that may be why.

6) Docking is very tedious

Try using the "Hide All Windows" Action - either CTRL+SHIFT+F12 or from the menu Window | Hide All Tool Windows
You can also map a keyboard shortcut to the "Hide Side" button/action - that can be useful
Finally, take a look at this thread for a tip on how to quickly toggle back to a "standard" layout of tools: http://www.jetbrains.net/devnet/message/5248991



Carlos answered #7 the same way I would.


In the end I'll say this...  Eclipse is going to do things different than IDEA and visa-versa. Eclipse might have a feature or two that IDEA does not. IDEA might have a few cons. But the JetBrains team is very good about fixing bugs or adding features when requested. If there are things you would like to see, open a feature request for them. In the end it is about the overall experience. And in my opinion, and in the opinion of most IDEA users, IntelliJ IDEA offers a far superior overall experience than Eclipse does. Every now and then, there are posts from Eclipse transplants talking about what's different in IDEA from Eclipse. Or what Eclipse features IDEA is missing. I know its hard for users that have used a program for a long time, but I I do not think it should be approached as "how does IDEA compare to Eclipse". But rather "How good of an IDE is IntelliJ IDEA."

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Hello Mark,

It's good to know that the numbered bookmarks are back. I don't know why  they were removed in the first place.

markv wrote:

2) Inability to disable structure view for some actions (like Go to type)

I mean, when you're trying to find a java type, if you have some large classes matching the typed text, and you try to navigate trough them using the up/down arrows, and the structure view is enabled, you'll notice that the structure view is populated with the contents of the selected class. The view is populated as the up/down key is pressed resulting in unwanted structure loading if you only want to go to a class at the bottom of the list.

markv wrote:

4) File structure popup does not search in the fields of the inner classes.

It can. It might be a bit unintuitive in the way you do it. You first need to select the inner class. Then you can search its members. So if you have an Inner class named MyInnerClass, you would:

  1) Type CTRL+F12 to open the File Structure Popup

  2) Start typing the name of you inner class until it is found, then hit enter to select it. For example "My[ENTER]

  3) you will then see a list of the members of the inner class. Just start typing the name of the member you want to go to.

You could argue that this is a "bad" way to do it. I could just as easily argue that it is a good way as it keeps the file structure popup from becoming too crowded. Plus it solves the issue where you have multiple inner classes that all have the same method as is common when working in Swing. Either way, it is the way it works and it is workable.

I noticed that, but (and this can be an Eclipse habit) when I'm searching for a getTableCellRenderer method in a class that has more than one inner classes implementing this method, I can't see this method with the standard layout. So unless you know exactly which class implements this method, you have no other way but to enter on each inner class and look for the method. The Eclipse way is more intuitive, showing the structure in a tree that automatically expands, showing all methods that match the entered text, as children of their classes.

I agree that the method works if you know exactly what class you're looking for, but if you don't, you're lost.


I agree that one can live without perspectives or very exact docking features, as long as the ide helps you in other ways, which Idea does, and that's why I use it now.

About the tweaks for increasing Idea's speed.... Well, if you're an user that is tired of Eclipse and Netbeans and you have very large projects (which Eclipse handles flawlessly), then the first time you try Idea, you can get a little disappointed and might even give up, because the standard settings in Idea are slow for large projects, starting with the initial memory allocation (128 to 512), continuing with the default on the fly code inspection profile. Have you ever tried working with a 3000 lines .properties file? It's not very nice and with the structure view enabled.
Anyhow, one can overcome these issues, but you need a little patience. As an ex-Eclipse user (and let me tell you, Eclipse requires a lot of patience) I have the patience needed to do this, but other users may not. And it's a shame to have people abandoning this beautiful ide because of such small issues, that can be easily corrected with proper defaults.

Best regards,
Chris

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Hello Chris,

javachris wrote:

...but (and this can be an Eclipse habit) when I'm searching for a getTableCellRenderer method in a class that has more than one inner classes implementing this method, I can't see this method with the standard layout. So unless you know exactly which class implements this method, you have no other way but to enter on each inner class and look for the method. The Eclipse way is more intuitive, showing the structure in a tree that automatically expands, showing all methods that match the entered text, as children of their classes.


I agree that the method works if you know exactly what class you're looking for, but if you don't, you're lost

That's a good point. I'd recommend opening a feature request. I think what would be very useful is if that dialog defaults to the way it currently is, but if there was an option to "Include inner classes when searching" that you could toggle on. Let me know its YouTrack number and I'll be happy to vote for it.

Best Regards,
Mark

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Hello Mark,

Here is the feature request URL:

http://youtrack.jetbrains.net/issue/IDEA-52213

Thanks for sharing opinions.

Best regards,
Chris

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