Editor Problems

I currently find IntelliJ a bit hard to edit in given that there is no save on close and that reverting certain lines to previous versions from VCS while leaving others alone is tricky (one has to go through changes, open a separate file diff, search for changes, .the do the manual diff and replace) whereas in this one particular feature eclipse beats IntelliJ hands down.  In Eclipse on can just right click the change in the editor and choose revert block (or line) and its done.  No change view, no diff, just done.  Now that is change management "with pleasure".

Is there a plug-in that allows this or will a near future version of IntelliJ do this be default?

Also, I really miss having the pop-up when I hover the mouse pointer over a method call or type.  I don't want to have to hit a key or anything, just hover.

I like the completion speed in eclipse and there are more refactoring tools, but I might just have to use it for only those things and the coverage / analysis tools as the editor is a bit of an acquired taste that I still find a bit bitter.

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Hello Ryan,

You can revert a change in IntelliJ IDEA by clicking on the change marker
in the gutter and selecting the "Revert" icon in the toolbar that appears.
It's default functionality for many versions of IntelliJ IDEA.

We don't currently plan to implement tooltips on hover, as we believe that
this feature creates more visual clutter than actual benefits. The Ctrl-hover
popups and the Ctrl-Q quick documentation popup are, of course, here to stay.

I currently find IntelliJ a bit hard to edit in given that there is no
save on close and that reverting certain lines to previous versions
from VCS while leaving others alone is tricky (one has to go through
changes, open a separate file diff, search for changes, .the do the
manual diff and replace) whereas in this one particular feature
eclipse beats IntelliJ hands down.  In Eclipse on can just right click
the change in the editor and choose revert block (or line) and its
done.  No change view, no diff, just done.  Now that is change
management "with pleasure".

Is there a plug-in that allows this or will a near future version of
IntelliJ do this be default?

Also, I really miss having the pop-up when I hover the mouse pointer
over a method call or type.  I don't want to have to hit a key or
anything, just hover.

I like the completion speed in eclipse and there are more refactoring
tools, but I might just have to use it for only those things and the
coverage / analysis tools as the editor is a bit of an acquired taste
that I still find a bit bitter.


--
Dmitry Jemerov
Development Lead
JetBrains, Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com/
"Develop with Pleasure!"


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Dmitry,
  Thanks for your response.  In the change marker in the editor, I see four menu items: Show Line Numbers, Show Indent Guides, Use Soft Wraps, and Annotate.  I don't see Revert as an option.  I'm using 10.0.3.

As for your other comment, IntelliJ by default has the virtual spacing option on.  However, there is an option to not allow the caret to proceed past end of line.  Why can't we have an option, disabled by default, to hover when I want to so as to make my development experience more pleasurable (either tooltips on or off as I desire)?

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Hello Ryan,

Thanks for your response.  In the change marker in the editor, I see
four menu items: Show Line Numbers, Show Indent Guides, Use Soft
Wraps, and Annotate.  I don't see Revert as an option.  I'm using
10.0.3.


You need to left click the change marker, not right click it.

As for your other comment, IntelliJ by default has the virtual spacing
option on.  However, there is an option to not allow the caret to
proceed past end of line.  Why can't we have an option, disabled by
default, to hover when I want to so as to make my development
experience more pleasurable (either tooltips on or off as I desire)?


It's certainly possible to implement. However, every time we implement a
feature that is disabled by default, the majority of users will not know
that it exists, will not enable it, and will not benefit from it. We prefer
to spend our development effort on features that bring visible benefit to
more users.

--
Dmitry Jemerov
Development Lead
JetBrains, Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com/
"Develop with Pleasure!"


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>We don't currently plan to implement tooltips on hover, as we believe that
this feature creates more visual clutter than actual benefits. The Ctrl-hover
popups and the Ctrl-Q quick documentation popup are, of course, here to stay.

I and it seems numerous others would like the option of having this feature.
Is there a ticket for it? I have a hard time searching for tickets.

Imho, the major reason you dislike the documentation tooltips on hovering is because you
seem to like the javadoc standard of exhaustive documentation.
I prefer to see upon hover just the summary, not the parameters info, ie like in Visual Studio.
Also, if one is judicious with commenting, the documentation need not add so much clutter.

I also would like to know how to turn off warnings for not documenting parameters.
I document them in the summary, eg, "Rename the given aString to the given bString."
Is there a ticket for that?
thank you!

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AnneTheAgile wrote:


Also, if one is judicious with commenting, the documentation need not add so much clutter.

Comments are for maintainers of the method. Javodoc documentation is for users of the method. They serve different purposes and different audiences. In many cases, a user of a method does not have access to the source code, and  therefore cannot read the comments. And even if he does have access to the source code, the user of a method should not have to dig through the source code to determine how to use the method or to learn about any caveats. That should all be  contained in the Javadoc. After all, you have access to the source code for all JDK methods. Do you open up the source code for JDK methods to learn ho to use them, or do you read the JavaDocs?

AnneTheAgile wrote:


I also would like to know how to turn off warnings for not documenting parameters.
I document them in the summary, eg, "Rename the given aString to the given bString."
Is there a ticket for that?


<soapbox>I would personally disagree with your not following the standard way of documenting a method. The standard exists so things are documented the same way for all method, regardless of who wrote them. It's nice to be able to look in a consistent place to quickly see what the parameters are and do. Additionally, some tools, success IDEs, may look for and use the parameter notations.</soapbox>

Nevertheless, if you want to disable the warning, no ticket is needed:
  Option 1: File > Settings > Inspections > Javadoc issues > Declaration has Javadoc problems
  Option 2: Place the cursor on the warning highlighted method, type alt+enter, select the "add tag @param for parameter 'X'", hit the right arrow key (or mouse click the arrow icon) to open options, select "Edit inspection profile setting"
You can either decrease the severity of the warning, or disable it.

Note that inspection profiles are typically applied to the project. Although you can set then globally, or set on the template project profile so all new projects use that settling. For more information, see the following topics in the help guide:
IntelliJ IDEA > Basic Concepts > Scope and Profiles > Inspection Profile  (also look at the other references & procedure noted on the bottom)
IntelliJ IDEA > IntelliJ IDEA Usage Guidelines > Configuring Project Settings > Accessing Settings and Structure of a Template Project

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You can vote for http://youtrack.jetbrains.net/issue/IDEABKL-5999
Note that, when deciding whether to implement a feature, we place far more weight on the standard way of how it would be used, not on a particular user's interpretation. It doesn't matter whether we like the javadoc standard or not - it's still the standard, and it's how the comments are written in most of the existing Java projects.

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Click on change marker and then click on 'revert'


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