22 comments
Comment actions Permalink

Love the functionality. Love it, love it, love it, love it, love it. The idea that everyone will be automatically running inspections before check-in makes me just giddy.

That said, the current dialog is very confusing. It's a major usability bug that you choose to do a commit by saying "No". If you want to have two different actions available from that point, you need to be more explicit. In particular, you need to rename the buttons from "Yes/No/Cancel" to "Review/Commit/Cancel", and change the wording of the dialog to reflect that.

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

Thanks, Dave.
I was just too lazy to complain about this.
Also I find it a little irritating that it is "Errors" in IDE settings, but "Code Smells" here.
I like "Code Smells" better - one reason is that I also find it strange that errors could be either
warnings or errors.

Dave Griffith wrote:

Love the functionality. Love it, love it, love it, love it, love it. The idea that everyone will be automatically running inspections before check-in makes me just giddy.

That said, the current dialog is very confusing. It's a major usability bug that you choose to do a commit by saying "No". If you want to have two different actions available from that point, you need to be more explicit. In particular, you need to rename the buttons from "Yes/No/Cancel" to "Review/Commit/Cancel", and change the wording of the dialog to reflect that.

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

That's funny, I thought of complaining about the naming, but was too lazy.

We now have the same functionality named "Errors", "Inspections" and "Code Smells" in different parts of the IDE. It's worth merging these, and "Code Smells" seems like the best and sexiest of the names.

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

I think "code smells" replacing "errors" and "inspections" everywhere
would not be a good thing. When I see "code smell" I immediately think
about the smell of the bathroom here. I don't think this is a good
phrase to associate with your $500 product.

Dave Griffith wrote:

That's funny, I thought of complaining about the naming, but was too
lazy.

We now have the same functionality named "Errors", "Inspections" and
"Code Smells" in different parts of the IDE. It's worth merging
these, and "Code Smells" seems like the best and sexiest of the
names.

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

I don't like 'code smells' either. I would rather stick with inspect code, inspection, etc.

0
Comment actions Permalink

+1

Dave Griffith wrote:

Love the functionality. Love it, love it, love it, love it, love it. The idea that everyone will be automatically running inspections before check-in makes me just giddy.

>

That said, the current dialog is very confusing. It's a major usability bug that you choose to do a commit by saying "No". If you want to have two different actions available from that point, you need to be more explicit. In particular, you need to rename the buttons from "Yes/No/Cancel" to "Review/Commit/Cancel", and change the wording of the dialog to reflect that.

>

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

Where/how can I configure it/turn it off?

Thanks,
Peter

0
Comment actions Permalink

On the version control check-in panels.

--Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

Dave Griffith wrote:

We now have the same functionality named "Errors", "Inspections" and "Code Smells" in different parts of the IDE. It's worth merging these, and "Code Smells" seems like the best and sexiest of the names.


While I agree about the naming, there's something extremely more important: Make the
settings configurable per project/module. There's so extremely useful stuff in there, but
it also greatly depends on the kind of project you're working on. I have turned most of it
off because I don't want to see warnings all over the place just because I like a very
strict profile for just one project, but cannot enforce it on others I have no control over.

Sascha

0
Comment actions Permalink

In article <dlvvd1$ot4$2@is.intellij.net>, keith@cs.oswego.edu says...

I think "code smells" replacing "errors" and "inspections" everywhere
would not be a good thing. When I see "code smell" I immediately think
about the smell of the bathroom here. I don't think this is a good
phrase to associate with your $500 product.

Dave Griffith wrote:

That's funny, I thought of complaining about the naming, but was too
lazy.

We now have the same functionality named "Errors", "Inspections" and
"Code Smells" in different parts of the IDE. It's worth merging
these, and "Code Smells" seems like the best and sexiest of the
names.

--Dave Griffith

I agree. I've never liked the term "code smell." It sounds
unprofessional and frankly, sucks.
--
-


David H. McCoy


-


0
Comment actions Permalink

Keith

I don't think this is a good phrase to associate with your $500 product.


In the - "professional" - refactoring world, "code smell" is well known,
well understood, and has been in use for years.
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?CodeSmell

"A code smell is a hint that something has gone wrong somewhere in
your code. Use the smell to track down the problem."

This last sentence makes clear why it's called that way.



From http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?WhatIsaSmell

"A CodeSmell is an attribute of code that frequently needs to be
debugged, or is hard to add features to.
In practice, a CodeSmell is a warning sign. It is an alarm that says,
"investigate more carefully and proceed with caution". It is not a
guarantee that something is wrong, but merely a hint that problems may
be brewin"

Even Wikipedia knows about it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_smell


When I see "code smell" I immediately think about the smell of the
bathroom here.


This is not a code smell, this is a code stench :

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?CodeStench

:)
Alain

0
Comment actions Permalink

Yup codesmell is normal, and though techie term, appropriate.

R


0
Comment actions Permalink

In article <dm9fbn$ojj$1@is.intellij.net>,
Alain Ravet <alain.ravet@biz.tiscali.be> wrote:

Keith

I don't think this is a good phrase to associate with your $500 product.


In the - "professional" - refactoring world, "code smell" is well known,
well understood, and has been in use for years.
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?CodeSmell


And if you are in an XP shop, that terminology makes a lot of sense. I
have several clients now, though, who detest XP terminology, after some
terrible XP failures. For them, the terminology 'Code Smell' is as
unprofessional as 'Brutal Sarcasm' in the meeting room.

I would rather avoid a term that those using a different methodology
would find off-putting. Why bias users against a good tool?

For what it is worth, at those clients, we call them either potential
problems or warning signs.

Scott

--
Scott Ellsworth
scott@alodar.nospam.com
Java and database consulting for the life sciences

0
Comment actions Permalink

If my code passes all inspections, I would appreciate it if IDEA would compliment the smell of my code.

"Yea code smells of roses and summer rain, may I please check it in for you?"

0
Comment actions Permalink

Very useful feature!

But although the name 'Code smell' may be well accepted in some geeky circles, I do find it a bit puerile. This gives it unwanted associations and makes it irritating and distracting.

0
Comment actions Permalink

Dave

I do find it a bit puerile.


It's called code smell, not code fart.


.. Code smell' may be well accepted in some geeky circles,


... that are by an extreme coincidence exactly IDEA's prime target.
I understand CEO and HR could be shocked, but who cares, as they never
see nor touch IDEA?



Alain

0
Comment actions Permalink

It's called code smell, not code fart.


That's exactly what I mean by unwanted associations. I just find it distracting, which is the last thing I need when working with CVS...

>> .. Code smell' may be well accepted in some geeky circles,

... that are by an extreme coincidence exactly IDEA's prime target.


Notice I said 'some' geeky circles. The responses from people in this forum (who are, presumably, IDEA's 'prime targets') would indicate that we are not uniformly in favour.

0
Comment actions Permalink

The responses from people in this forum (who are, presumably, IDEA's 'prime targets') would indicate that we are not uniformly in favour.

We're not 'prime targets'! We're the ones who shoot back!

Dave Griffith

0
Comment actions Permalink

When working with legacy code there will probably be a lot of code smells. I'd like to commit a change without cleaning the entire file, so I think the warnings are a little annoying. Still, I'd like to be warned if the number of code smells has increased due to the changes I've made.

0

Please sign in to leave a comment.