workspaces and migrating from eclipse

I would like to know from other users that have migrated from eclipse how they set up their IDEA projects.
The FAQ says the closest thing IDEA has to a workspace, from which to manage multiple projects(eclipse), is the IDEA project.

Do most people use one IDEA project and create multiple IDEA modules within that project to mimic the eclipse notion of project within a workspace? Or do you just create a separate project(IDEA) per project(eclipse) and have multiple windows open?

There are quite a few annoyances when trying to use modules within a project to mimic the way it's done in eclipse, but maybe I'm missing something. How do people manage multiple code bases/projects within IDEA??

Thanks,
Christian

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Original message URL: http://devnet.jetbrains.net/message/5302160#5302160

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I have to say I am normally going the other way around when eclipse users start popping up in the project team.
I don't try to 'mimic the eclipse notion of project within a workspace' because I think it is fundamentally a bad idea that can lead to bad practice (see below).

I tend to have one window per project.

However, you need to be careful how you define 'project'.

For me a project has my ant (or pom) file at the root and anything underneath it in the directory structure is included in the project.
That might include modules for separate artifacts.

However, I often see eclipse users creating 'projects' in the sub-directories for no other reason than eclipse can't handle test vs src classpaths separately (unless it is a maven project) or as a workaround for poor performance.
This has led to some really complicated ant scripts that don't make sense outside of eclipse.
So you need to be careful about which projects you import.

Another thing I see is that eclipse users link projects to other projects in the workspace as dependencies.
This is perfectly legitamate and IDEA does it with modules too.
However, I often see people linking outside the root of the (ant/pom) project, which then makes the project uncompilable unless you know to check out the other project.

This is the main reason that I have separate windows.
Everything I see in one window is a self contained project to work with.

If I have a separate code base I have a sepate window so there is no chance of overlap.

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I use a Window per project. I actually hate the way Eclipse requires (or at least strongly suggests?) that you put multiple projects in a single workspace. I just find that opening yourself to many interdependency problems that don't occur if each logically seperate project is setup as its own entity.

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