Why care what JRE IDEA uses?

I'm still confused about why people seem so interested in using 1.5 for IDEA runtime. I'm excited to use 1.5 for my own projects, but I just can't get why I should care a lick what JVM IDEA itself uses. Are you guys running 1.5 seeing some tangible benefits? Or is it just the "cool" factor?

The one time I experimented with it I was hoping to see a speed increase. Startup time, however, was exactly the same as with the shipping JRE.

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With 5.0 VM, It would start and run faster, and the Windows L&F would look
better. You can't use the IDEA GUI designer for any serious Java 5.0 projects
because it won't compile any custom components you have in your palette (yes,
GUI designer is basically unusable for Java 5.0 projects). It would also
be nice to be able to develop plugins which used new 5.0 features.

I'm still confused about why people seem so interested in using 1.5
for IDEA runtime. I'm excited to use 1.5 for my own projects, but I
just can't get why I should care a lick what JVM IDEA itself uses.
Are you guys running 1.5 seeing some tangible benefits? Or is it just
the "cool" factor?

The one time I experimented with it I was hoping to see a speed
increase. Startup time, however, was exactly the same as with the
shipping JRE.




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the Windows L&F would look better.


Did you (or anybody else) tried WinLAF?

You can't use the IDEA GUI designer for any serious Java
5.0 projects because it won't compile any custom components you have in
your palette (yes, GUI designer is basically unusable for Java 5.0
projects).


Sorry to say, but IMHO this is not limited to Java 5.0. The GUI designer is
as limited (to non-serious projects) as quite all others as well. For me,
the most important reason (already discussed a lot) is, that it cannot use
existing components, but wants to create it's own. Hence I started my VisualLayout, a visually configurable layout manager (TableLayout-like).]]>

It would also be nice to be able to develop plugins which
used new 5.0 features.


This indeed would be nice, although I doubt, that the PSI-API would benefit
much from it. I'm sure, it would still be necessary to cast very much.

Tom

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I'm still confused about why people seem so
interested in using 1.5 for IDEA runtime.


1) Fonts, fonts and fonts. Font handling is greatly improved on 1.5 JRE's, specially on Linux. Antialiasing is actually usable on the newer JRE's. Ever tried using an antialiased font against a dark background lately?

2) Performance and footprint, but really, these play a minor part compared to how happy I am with the font improvements.

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>> the Windows L&F would look better.
>>

Did you (or anybody else) tried WinLAF?


Yes, it doesn't work with IDEA. There are two bugs in the tracker related
to this.

>> You can't use the IDEA GUI designer for any serious Java 5.0 projects
>> because it won't compile any custom components you have in your
>> palette (yes, GUI designer is basically unusable for Java 5.0
>> projects).
>>

Sorry to say, but IMHO this is not limited to Java 5.0. The GUI
designer is as limited (to non-serious projects) as quite all others
as well. For me, the most important reason (already discussed a lot)
is, that it cannot use existing components, but wants to create it's
own. <ad>Hence I started my VisualLayout, a visually configurable
layout manager (TableLayout-like).</ad>


You're saying "the gui designer is limited to my non-serious projects." I'm
saying it's limited to EVERYONE's projects with custom components.

>> It would also be nice to be able to develop plugins which used new
>> 5.0 features.
>>

This indeed would be nice, although I doubt, that the PSI-API would
benefit much from it. I'm sure, it would still be necessary to cast
very much.


Covariant returns could be used for things like copy(), and I imagine UserDataHolder
could be generified. Lists could be used instead of arrays while being just
as type safe and clear.

-Keith


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