Quick Implementations

For how long this has been available? I just noticed that on 3185, and I can't believe I was missing it. Sweet!

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What are they and how do you find them?

Norris Shelton
Sun Certified Java Programmer




Marcus Brito wrote:

>For how long this has been available? I just noticed that on 3185, and I can't believe I was missing it. Sweet!

>

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Marcus Brito wrote:

>For how long this has been available? I just noticed that on 3185, and I can't believe I was missing it.
>Sweet!

>

True, it's a very nice feature: too bad its default shortcut -
Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the LineMover plugin :(

Alain

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What are they and how do you find them?


Hit CTRL-SHIFT-I on a class, method, field, variable, etc. It shows the
source in a little popup box (like the Quick Javadoc popup)

Tobin

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CtrlShiftQ, no?

:S

Franklin.

Tobin Juday wrote:
>> What are they and how do you find them?


Hit CTRL-SHIFT-I on a class, method, field, variable, etc. It shows the
source in a little popup box (like the Quick Javadoc popup)

Tobin

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Here it's shown when I press CtrlShiftQ.

:S

Franklin.

Alain Ravet wrote:

Marcus Brito wrote:

>> For how long this has been available? I just noticed that on 3185, and
>> I can't believe I was missing it. Sweet!
>>
>>


True, it's a very nice feature: too bad its default shortcut -
Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the LineMover plugin :(

Alain

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Franklin wrote:

CtrlShiftQ, no?




There a nice little plugin
DescribeKey

that tells you all the actions linked to any shortcut.
(Once installed, it's mapped to Alt-Ctrl-K)

Alain

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Here it always shows the first occurence twice, regardless of what I
select. Anybody else seing this?

Tobin Juday wrote:
>> What are they and how do you find them?


Hit CTRL-SHIFT-I on a class, method, field, variable, etc. It shows the
source in a little popup box (like the Quick Javadoc popup)

Tobin


--
Martin Fuhrer
Fuhrer Engineering AG
http://www.fuhrer.com

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Doesn't show for me at all.

Norris Shelton
Sun Certified Java Programmer




Franklin wrote:

Here it's shown when I press CtrlShiftQ.

>

:S

>

Franklin.

>

Alain Ravet wrote:

>
>> Marcus Brito wrote:
>>
>>> For how long this has been available? I just noticed that on 3185,
>>> and I can't believe I was missing it. Sweet!
>>>
>>>
>>
>> True, it's a very nice feature: too bad its default shortcut -
>> Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the LineMover plugin :(
>>
>> Alain
>

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Yup. I'm getting doubled lists as well. Sweet feature, tho.

--Dave Griffith

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I've got it as Ctrl-Alt-Shift-I. Is there some logic whereby IDEA attempts to automatically avoid keymapping clashes for new features?

--Dave Griffith

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it's a very nice feature


I second this.

too bad its default shortcut - Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the LineMover plugin


I have mapped Move Lines to Ctrl-Shift-Up/Down. Why you haven't? BTW, I
cannot live without this plugin any more.

Tom

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Alain Ravet wrote:

True, it's a very nice feature: too bad its default shortcut -
Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the LineMover plugin :(


Also clashes with my JIRA plugin :(

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Tom

>> too bad its default shortcut - Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the
>> LineMover plugin
>

I have mapped Move Lines to Ctrl-Shift-Up/Down. Why you haven't? BTW,
I cannot live without this plugin any more.

>


1/ Reaching "I" and "K" requires less movement of the right hand than
reaching Up/Down do. I use it so often, I want it to be as simple as
possible.
and
2/ 'I' is free on MacOS, and it matches 'P' better than 'Command-I'
does.


Alain


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Mark

>> too bad its default shortcut - Shift-Ctrl-I - collides with the
>> LineMover plugin :(
>

Also clashes with my JIRA plugin :(




I'm pretty sure you move lines much much much more often than you file
JIRA entries.


Alain

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I'm pretty sure you move lines much much much more often than you file
JIRA entries.


Depends on the your code I think :D

R

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It's an interesting feature, but I prefer the functionality of ctrl-hover and ctrl-click. The presentation of the information is less intrusive on ctrl-hover than ctrl-shift-i and popping up the implementation details in a frameless window is less useful to me than opening up the source document in its own tab as is done with ctrl-click.

Also, unlike many out there, I find keyboard navigation less convenient than mouse navigation (especially with a trackball).

With that said, I wouldn't want either of these options removed. Everyone has their own preferences.

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This feature is actually replacement to CtrlAltB, not for Ctrl+B and its
mouse analogies like ctrlhover and ctrlclick.

It's an interesting feature, but I prefer the functionality of
ctrl-hover and ctrl-click. The presentation of the information is
less intrusive on ctrl-hover than ctrl-shift-i and popping up the
implementation details in a frameless window is less useful to me than
opening up the source document in its own tab as is done with
ctrl-click.

Also, unlike many out there, I find keyboard navigation less
convenient than mouse navigation (especially with a trackball).

With that said, I wouldn't want either of these options removed.
Everyone has their own preferences.



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1/ Reaching "I" and "K" requires less movement of the right hand than
reaching Up/Down do. I use it so often, I want it to be as simple as
possible.
and


Depends on where the hand starts ;) And, at least my hands much easier find
the up- and down-arrow-keys than I and K.

Tom

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Tom

>> 1/ Reaching "I" and "K" requires less movement of the right hand
>> than reaching Up/Down do. I use it so often, I want it to be as
>> simple as possible.
>> and
>
>

Depends on where the hand starts ;)


They start on the middle row.
On the AZERTY keyboard, the 'K' is under the middle finger, when yours
hands rest on the middle row.
'I' is just the row above, with the same finger, so you see, it's pretty
intuitive **1 (on my keyboar at least).

Alain

**1 : I know, I know: "Nothing is intuitive, but the nipple. Everything
else is learned."

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