why convert to c# or .net?

I have seen several posts in here and other places of people "moving their java code to c# or .net". I'm just curious why? I have looked at c# and it is very similar to java. From my "java" perspective c# ties you to one particluar operating system and lacks the security of java. I think if people take time to really learn swing they will find it an excellent design for gui's and the j2ee model is also very good. I would love to hear anyone elses thoughts on this.

3 comments

I think that you misunderstood the posts. I am fairly sure that they were
moving to c# and/or .net development because they are (most likely)
consultants or contract employees and their next assignment is with c#
and/or .net.
I would be extremely surprised to see IDEA EAPers choosing to port code
from java to .net.

"charles decroes" <spam@decroes.com> wrote in message
news:1569833.1077044095881.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

I have seen several posts in here and other places of people "moving their

java code to c# or .net". I'm just curious why? I have looked at c# and it
is very similar to java. From my "java" perspective c# ties you to one
particluar operating system and lacks the security of java. I think if
people take time to really learn swing they will find it an excellent design
for gui's and the j2ee model is also very good. I would love to hear anyone
elses thoughts on this.


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I can understand consultants. This was actually a post in a resharper news thread. I obviously feel like you and wonder why anyone would but people (managers) do crazy stuff all the time ;)

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In article <1569833.1077044095881.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net>,
charles decroes <spam@decroes.com> wrote:

I have seen several posts in here and other places of people "moving their
java code to c# or .net". I'm just curious why? I have looked at c# and it
is very similar to java.


Sometimes you have to. I am still working in the java space, and plan
on staying there, but we have projects that are windows only, and where
the access to the system is via a dll. Your choices are runtime.exec,
C#, VB, or ActiveX. Of these, C# is not a bad choice. If the entire
system is windows only and designed this way, adding a new piece of
software in a different language (like Java, or Perl for that matter)
may not make good sense.

Further, if the critter is going to be deployed on IIS running against
SqlServer, you might get much better overall performance from a C#
implementation. MS tests that one, and does not push for fast Java
performance. (On the other hand, you might get slower performance if a
bunch of java db experts have tuned their third party jdbc drivers...)

Scott

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