I recommend you use Jira for your bug tracking


The current tracker is a bit primitive - you should check out Jira as it is also very cheap.

(I dont work for them - but we are Jira users)

Regards,
Nick

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JIRA is a very good issue and project's progress tracker. But I doubt, that JetBrains could integrate it smoothly into ITN.

Tom

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Does JIRA offer mail forum <-> newsgroup synchronization? I made a
quick check on their site, and couldn't find any reference to such a
feature.

Nick Minutello wrote:
> The current tracker is a bit primitive -
What does JIRA offer that is really missing from the current ITN version?

Alain Ravet

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Actually, the way I phrased my earlier post was poor - I didnt intend it to sound like an advertisement for Jira.

What I meant to say was:
"This bug tracker is rather primitive (ie, its just a forum) - you should consider something else - a proper bug tracking product. I recommend Jira because its good. It also happens to be very affordable @ $800 per server"

>> Does JIRA offer mail forum <-> newsgroup synchronization?
Not sure what you mean. What exactly do you mean? There is no NNTP access if thats what you are asking.

What Jira does do is:
Offers an RSS feed - which most blog readers or news aggregators digest very nicely. (Also means that ITN can aggregate it right into their site with some XSLT).

Out of the box, Jira offers bi-directional integration with POP3/SMTP email (ie notifications of changes/comments with a bug - and also you can reply by email and the contents of your email are appended as comments. ITN can easily add custom email handlers too if they want more advanced functionality)
See here: http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/docs/services.jsp

*>> What does JIRA offer that is really missing from the
>> current ITN version?*

Many things:

For a start it is a proper Issue Tracking tool - not a customised forum - so its UI and featureset is more suited to the task.

+ Much nicer user interface. Its very intuitive and ergonomic - all desired info is at a glance or one click away. (e.g "All issues reported by me")

+ Much more powerful and useful filtering.

+ Much better text search facility (more control)
http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/docs/searchindex.jsp

+ There is an upcoming SOAP interface - so you will be able to post a bug/feature request directly from IDEA.

+ More powerful email notification capabilities - more than just "watch" (we wouldnt necessarily benefit from this - but I suspect that ITN would)

+ Bug/feature/improvement Categorisation by component/aspect (e.g. for IntelliJ it could be the different development environments EJB, JSP, Java, XML, Live Templates, Plugin API, etc etc)

+ Road map reporting (see what bugs/features are scheduled for what version)

+ Issue linking (which is currently done manually - via "duplicates")

+ Issue voting

+ Priority is properly supported.

+ Email integration is somewhat more polished (ie subject contains reference to the bug) Also, the mail I received from this thing sent me to an invalid URL - a configuration error I suspect: This is what I got :
http://www.intellij.net/tracker/viewSCR?threadId=20074

+ Integration with CVS (and other SCM systems) (not useful to users - but no doubt useful to JetBrains)

The only thing that Jira doesnt have that Jive does is text formatting and spell checking.

Other than that, for Issue Tracking, it beats Jive hands down.

Regards,
Nick

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>> But I doubt, that JetBrains could integrate it smoothly into ITN

Using RSS and XSLT you can integrate it however you want.

-Nick

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I enjoy the simplicity of tracker. In fact I would love to get rid of our
current MKS install and use Tracker internally.

"Nick Minutello" <jiveadmin@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:637938.1041511492859.JavaMail.jrun@is.intellij.net...
>

The current tracker is a bit primitive - you should check out Jira as it

is also very cheap.
>

(I dont work for them - but we are Jira users)

>

Regards,
Nick



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>> I enjoy the simplicity of tracker.
Jira is also very simple/intuitive.
It also does a lot more. (see my comparison above)

If you havent already, you can check it out on the web http://jira.atlassian.com - there is a test project (create yourself a user) - but that wont let you see what you can do administratively. You can also download a stand-alone eval (bundles Tomcat) to check out the more impressive features.

In fact, I am a little confused: What is the relationship between Tracker and Jive? (I thought they were one and the same - are they 2 different things sharing the same database?)

>> In fact I would love to get rid of our current MKS
>> install and use Tracker internally.

I have not come across MKS before.
We are currently ejecting Rational CQ for Jira.

We are also looking at bi-directional integration with our legacy Remedy system (via SOAP and email). If it can be done with that piece of junk - the same should be possible with almost anything else...

-Nick

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Nick Minutello wrote:

What I meant to say was: "This bug tracker is rather primitive (ie,
its just a forum)


Just wanted to double-check: You do use the actual tracker
(http://www.intellij.net/tracker/idea/browse), not the message forums?

+ Much nicer user interface. Its very intuitive and ergonomic - all
desired info is at a glance or one click away. (e.g "All issues
reported by me")


Just search for submitter equals , or set up a saved filter. > + Road map reporting (see what bugs/features are scheduled for what >]]> version)

There's no actual road map, but you can search for "planned for" equals
Aurora to see what has already been committed to for that version.

+ Issue voting


This is present in the tracker.

+ Priority is properly supported.


I'm not sure what you mean by "property", but requests are given low,
normal, high, very high, critical, or stopshop priority.

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Just wanted to double-check: You do use the actual tracker, not the message forums?

Yes. There was some confusion in the beginning, I will admit. I just thought they were one and the same thing.

What is Tracker anyway? Is it an in-house built thing?

>> Just search for submitter equals , or set >> up a saved filter. In Jira its one the front page when I log in. You can also save filters in Jira if you want that as well. >> There's no actual road map, but you can search >> for "planned for" equals Aurora to see what has already >> been committed to for that version. It would be more useful to see features/fixes planned for each build number. Have a look at Jira if you havent - you will see what I mean. The reporting is better than having to do a search manually. >> I'm not sure what you mean by "property", but requests >> are given low, normal, high, very high, critical, or >> stopshop priority But, I cant enter the priority when I enter a bug/request. >> > + Issue voting >>]]> This is present in the tracker.
Yes, you are right. I missed that.

Have you looked at the Jira available on the web? There is a test project where you can hack around - and there is the Jira project itself - so you can actually see it poplulated with a real-workd project.

-Nick

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Nick Minutello wrote:

Yes. There was some confusion in the beginning, I will admit. I just
thought they were one and the same thing.


OK.

I wasn't saying that it's better than Jira, just wanted to point out
that a few things you wanted could be done in the ITN tracker too, even
if it may be a bit more difficult.

It would be more useful to see features/fixes planned for each build
number.


But do they really plan ahead in that much detail? So that they know
that feature X will be implemented 23 builds from now and bug Y will be
fixed in 7 builds?

This may be more useful for products with a limited number of builds,
like Mozilla (1.3 alpha, 1.3 beta, 1.3, 1.4 alpha, ... with about 6
weeks between releases), not for IDEA with about two early access builds
per week (40 builds in 5 months, july to november).

But, I cant enter the priority when I enter a bug/request.


In this case I think IntelliJ want to assign their own priority to the
request. You show your own priorities by voting.

Anyway, I'd certainly like to see a lot of the things you pointed out,
but I doubt they will change to another tracker since it's another
IntelliJ product. If you want a better tracker the best way is probably
to add your own requests and vote for existing ones at
http://www.intellij.net/tracker/itn/browse.

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If you havent already, you can check it out on the
web http://jira.atlassian.com - there is a test
project (create yourself a user) -


I quickly browsed, and it seems that the biggest difference is that Jira has a number of pre-defined filters. With ITN, you must define them yourself, and then keep changing them to match the latest release (for example).

It would be nice to have filters for "all problems fixed in the latest release", or "all features planned for the next major release" These things are not easily done by hand because the release granularity is so small for IDEA.

I of course didn't look into it in a lot of detail, and didn't see the administrator functions.

Mike

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No, the main difference is, that you can see the progress. Take a look
at the Road Map.

Cheers,
Tom

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We indeed purchase JIRA a half year ago, because it is the most
easy-to-use and powerful-enough project-tracker. We have evaluated a lot
tools and found, that JIRA was by far the best.

Cheers,
Tom

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