Debug JSP without exploding directory

Guys,

Is there a way to debug JSP pages without using the exploded web directory (in IntelliJ 5)? This is way too slow when I have tonnes of files in a project.

Ideally, I want to do a "Remote" debug on a Tomcat instance which I start separately (via console). From past postings, I doubt it.. but want to get a confirmation.

Curious, can anyone share their experience on using explode web directory feature on large projects?

Regards,
KcTang

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I am curious why you think using a .war will be faster than an exploded
directory. All of us here use an exploded directory for development
because that allows us to package the specific files that changed
instead of rebuilding the entire war. With that said, I don't think
exploded or .war would have any impact upon debugging. I debug
applications in an exploded directory and also in an .ear.

I have not used remote debugging in over a year and a half. All of my
work is on my local machine. We used to develop like that, but once you
have more than 2 or 3 guys working on the same application, it gets
impossible to do anything meaningful without someone blowing away the
context beneath you. Is your local workstation a limitation?

KcTang wrote: >Guys, > >Is there a way to debug JSP pages without using the exploded web directory (in IntelliJ 5)? This is way too slow when I have tonnes of files in a project. > >Ideally, I want to do a "Remote" debug on a Tomcat instance which I start separately (via console). From past postings, I doubt it.. but want to get a confirmation. > >Curious, can anyone share their experience on using explode web directory feature on large projects? > >Regards, >]]>KcTang

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Actually, the approach used is to have the web application project structured in a way that it can be deployed without even making a .war file. This is done by changing Tomcat's base directory and editing some Tomcat server files to read from my project's web directory.

In other words, the project's web directory is a ready to run webapp. So, no need to .war or explode. Having the exploded dir in this case is a bit redundant (not to mention that the dir sync can be annoying).

Also, when I say "Remote" debugging.. i actually meant "IntelliJ IDEA allows you to debug remotely running processes (e.g. applications, servlets, plugin applets). To set options for debugging remote processes, select the Run | Edit Configurations menu item and go to the Remote tab." - so not necessarily debugging from another machine.

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It sounds like Tomcat is running your app from your development
directory. I used to develop that way. We stopped when we started
using CVS. We didn't want to deploy all the CVS folders to our
production machines, etc.

If you run Tomcat from within IJ, you don't have to muck with your TC
config files.

Either way, the way you are working is very convenient. Keep in mind
there are other options when your projects start to get complex.

KcTang wrote:

>Actually, the approach used is to have the web application project structured in a way that it can be deployed without even making a .war file. This is done by changing Tomcat's base directory and editing some Tomcat server files to read from my project's web directory.
>
>In other words, the project's web directory is a ready to run webapp. So, no need to .war or explode. Having the exploded dir in this case is a bit redundant (not to mention that the dir sync can be annoying).
>
>Also, when I say "Remote" debugging.. i actually meant "IntelliJ IDEA allows you to debug remotely running processes (e.g. applications, servlets, plugin applets). To set options for debugging remote processes, select the Run | Edit Configurations menu item and go to the Remote tab." - so not necessarily debugging from another machine.

>

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