brackets/braces/parentheses

Hello!

My native english-speaking coworker told me that he might accept both
"bracket" and "brace" for curly brace as well as for square bracket symbols.
But parentheses can be only the round ones. Also, I got used to the notion,
that () are parentheses, [] are brackets or square brackets and {} are
braces or curly braces. If you hold to this notion you will not have to use
"square" and "curly" words and can make documentation more compact and
clear.

I am bringing this up becase these terms are used non-systematically in the
online help and in dialog windows, for example in "IDE Settings/Completion":

- Brackets -

  • Insert '('

  • Insert '()' when no arguments

  • Insert '()'

-



These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.

WBR,
Michael J.


5 comments
Comment actions Permalink

These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.


Or "(round) brackets"? :)
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.asp?searchword=bracket



0
Comment actions Permalink


"Andrei Oprea" <aoprea@creditwave.com> wrote in message
news:ausqoe$9aa$1@is.intellij.net...

These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.

>

Or "(round) brackets"? :)
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.asp?searchword=bracket


Yeah, this is another religious question. But isn't it easier to use one
word instead of two (better yet, 3 words instead of 6)? :)


0
Comment actions Permalink

Well, I agree with Michael somewhat; however, it isn't a question about
"making it shorter" -- it's about making people understand, and not everyone
reading the documentation is going to nitpick over such minor details -- so
long as they UNDERSTAND (which is the whole reason for writing
documentation).

Using such words like "curly" or "square" are ADJECTIVES, which help the
reader understand which "bracket" they should use -- therefore, despite
being correct about using the terms "brackets or. braces," sometimes it's
better to explain it this way (since they can be used interchangeable, and
they're both on the same key on the keyboard). If you walked up to the
average American, and asked them to "draw a bracket" and "draw a brace" --
half of them will probably not understand anything, and the other half will
draw various objects. In addition, British and American English (not
counting Australian, Canadian, or New Zealand's English) are at times
differing or conflicting (you should see the internal debates between those
who studied American English vs. British English).

Just my two sense -- We, of course, appreciate your feedback....

David


"Michael Jouravlev" <mikus@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:ausoqa$6t1$1@is.intellij.net...

Hello!

>

My native english-speaking coworker told me that he might accept both
"bracket" and "brace" for curly brace as well as for square bracket

symbols.

But parentheses can be only the round ones. Also, I got used to the

notion,

that () are parentheses, [] are brackets or square brackets and {} are
braces or curly braces. If you hold to this notion you will not have to

use

"square" and "curly" words and can make documentation more compact and
clear.

>

I am bringing this up becase these terms are used non-systematically in

the

online help and in dialog windows, for example in "IDE

Settings/Completion":
>

- Brackets -

  • Insert '('

  • Insert '()' when no arguments

  • Insert '()'

---------------

>

These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.

>

WBR,
Michael J.

>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

David,

the point is not that I insist on one particular spelling and meaning over
another. It is the consistency again. Online help lacks consistency. I would
like to see clear definition of each term used, and then adherence to this
definition. That is all. It is easier to play by the rules. And while you
spend some space and time explaining terms used, it would pay back later
writing short and clear help reference.

I also would argue with you that this IS about making it shorter AND making
people understand. Both of the following messages seem to ask the same
question: "Your application session is in progress. Do you really want to
quit?" and "Exit now?", but I prefer the second one. If you like the first
one, then it is better for me to stop whining ;)

Wth best regards,
Michael J.

"David J. Stennett" <david@intellij.com> wrote in message
news:av18g0$m42$1@is.intellij.net...

Well, I agree with Michael somewhat; however, it isn't a question about
"making it shorter" -- it's about making people understand, and not

everyone

reading the documentation is going to nitpick over such minor details --

so

long as they UNDERSTAND (which is the whole reason for writing
documentation).

>

Using such words like "curly" or "square" are ADJECTIVES, which help the
reader understand which "bracket" they should use -- therefore, despite
being correct about using the terms "brackets or. braces," sometimes it's
better to explain it this way (since they can be used interchangeable, and
they're both on the same key on the keyboard). If you walked up to the
average American, and asked them to "draw a bracket" and "draw a brace" --
half of them will probably not understand anything, and the other half

will

draw various objects. In addition, British and American English (not
counting Australian, Canadian, or New Zealand's English) are at times
differing or conflicting (you should see the internal debates between

those

who studied American English vs. British English).

>

Just my two sense -- We, of course, appreciate your feedback....

>

David

>
>

"Michael Jouravlev" <mikus@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:ausoqa$6t1$1@is.intellij.net...

Hello!

>

My native english-speaking coworker told me that he might accept both
"bracket" and "brace" for curly brace as well as for square bracket

symbols.

But parentheses can be only the round ones. Also, I got used to the

notion,

that () are parentheses, [] are brackets or square brackets and {} are
braces or curly braces. If you hold to this notion you will not have to

use

"square" and "curly" words and can make documentation more compact and
clear.

>

I am bringing this up becase these terms are used non-systematically in

the

online help and in dialog windows, for example in "IDE

Settings/Completion":
>

- Brackets -

  • Insert '('

  • Insert '()' when no arguments

  • Insert '()'

---------------

>

These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.

>

WBR,
Michael J.

>
>

>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

Michael:

See below with *****


"Michael Jouravlev" <mikus@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:av1ql6$fmi$1@is.intellij.net...

David,

>

the point is not that I insist on one particular spelling and meaning over
another. It is the consistency again. Online help lacks consistency. I

would

like to see clear definition of each term used, and then adherence to this
definition. That is all. It is easier to play by the rules. And while you
spend some space and time explaining terms used, it would pay back later
writing short and clear help reference.

          • I read you loud and clear here -- I am in full-agreement. We will

continue our efforts to improve to everyone's benefit... keep the
constructive feedback coming!

I also would argue with you that this IS about making it shorter AND

making

people understand. Both of the following messages seem to ask the same
question: "Your application session is in progress. Do you really want to
quit?" and "Exit now?", but I prefer the second one. If you like the first
one, then it is better for me to stop whining ;)

            • I would prefer "Exit now?" too -- however, it can depend on context -

AND -- again style of writing. Sometimes you might just have to tolerate
our "strange" writing, it's as simple as that. So long as the meaning --
the END RESULT -- is understood (and the English is correct), everything
else can be blamed on our own special quirks.

All the Best,

David


>

Wth best regards,
Michael J.

>

"David J. Stennett" <david@intellij.com> wrote in message
news:av18g0$m42$1@is.intellij.net...

Well, I agree with Michael somewhat; however, it isn't a question about
"making it shorter" -- it's about making people understand, and not

everyone

reading the documentation is going to nitpick over such minor details --

so

long as they UNDERSTAND (which is the whole reason for writing
documentation).

>

Using such words like "curly" or "square" are ADJECTIVES, which help the
reader understand which "bracket" they should use -- therefore, despite
being correct about using the terms "brackets or. braces," sometimes

it's

better to explain it this way (since they can be used interchangeable,

and

they're both on the same key on the keyboard). If you walked up to the
average American, and asked them to "draw a bracket" and "draw a

brace" --

half of them will probably not understand anything, and the other half

will

draw various objects. In addition, British and American English (not
counting Australian, Canadian, or New Zealand's English) are at times
differing or conflicting (you should see the internal debates between

those

who studied American English vs. British English).

>

Just my two sense -- We, of course, appreciate your feedback....

>

David

>
>

"Michael Jouravlev" <mikus@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:ausoqa$6t1$1@is.intellij.net...

Hello!

>

My native english-speaking coworker told me that he might accept both
"bracket" and "brace" for curly brace as well as for square bracket

symbols.

But parentheses can be only the round ones. Also, I got used to the

notion,

that () are parentheses, [] are brackets or square brackets and {} are
braces or curly braces. If you hold to this notion you will not have

to

use

"square" and "curly" words and can make documentation more compact and
clear.

>

I am bringing this up becase these terms are used non-systematically

in

the

online help and in dialog windows, for example in "IDE

Settings/Completion":
>

- Brackets -

  • Insert '('

  • Insert '()' when no arguments

  • Insert '()'

---------------

>

These are parenthses we are talking about in the preceding example.

>

WBR,
Michael J.

>
>

>
>

>
>


0

Please sign in to leave a comment.