EAP IDEA 3.0 Overview

Dear Fellow IntelliJ Fanatics and Community Supporters! J



I would like to introduce to all of you a little something we have been
working on . the IDEA 3.0 Overview. I am releasing a EAP version of it. for
your reading pleasure (I hope). Be warned! It isn't yet complete; however,
it is nearing completion and this is why I am releasing it now. I would
like to kindly ask those of you who do read it to send me feedback in any
form you see fit: corrections to the text, technical corrections about Java
(I've yet to bother the developers for them to check my often erratic bold
statements about Java), or even suggestions on what you would like to see
covered in the final version of the overview.



Please keep in mind, this overview is not meant (as noted in the intro) to
be a purely technical document, nor is it supposed to be an "aren't we so
great" marketing document. it lies probably somewhere in the middle. Just
think of it this way. if you knew nothing about IDEA, would this booklet
entice you to try IDEA? Or, for those of you wanting to convince your boss
to switch to IDEA, would this tickle him in the right places to listen to
your request?



Those of you who provide constructive feedback (to be determined by me,
Mhaaaaaaa) will get your names listed in the "acknowledgement" section of
the final version (both in electronic form, and if we do it, in the printed
as well!). This isn't a con, I just want to sincerely give credit where
credit is due to the community members who have been an instrumental part in
helping IntelliJ IDEA become what it is today.



Also, please post your feedback in the jetbrains.intellij.documentation
forum.. I'll be reading and sometimes replying to your post to get more
clarification when needed. You can download this overview from the EAP
section of www.intellij.net | EAP | Newest Build



Best!



David



JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



Note Bene! Please excuse the quality of the screenshots.... Adobe's Acrobat
Writer did a hachet job to them... they aren't so bad in the original .doc
files (honestly!).



14 comments
Comment actions Permalink

Quick general comment before I go to sleep mainly based on the outline and the little I read.

In my opinion what makes IDEA so superior is the following 3 key items:
1) powerful navigation (java/jsp/ant/xml)
2) intelligent editing (java/jsp/ant/xml/j2ee)
3) refactoring (java/jsp/ant/j2ee)

You covered extensively 2) and 3) but you almost did not talk about navigation. It is really important since IDEA makes understanding and working in the code so much easier making a developer a lot more productive a lot faster.

Things you might want to talk about some of these:
1.. Ctrl-Click/Ctrl-B - Ctrl-Alt-Click/Ctrl-Alt-B to drill down to definition - implementers
2.. Ctrl-Alt-Left/Right to go back/forward
3.. Ctrl-Shift-backspace to go to the last editing position
4.. Ctrl-H/Ctrl-Shift-H/Ctrl-Alt-H to view inheritance hierarchy, the method overriding/callers-callees
5.. Ctrl-N/Ctrl-Shift-N to go quickly to a class or to any file (you forgot that last one)
6.. Ctrl-F12 to go to a member
7.. Find Usage with all its variants (class, methods,...)
8.. Ctrl-Alt-F7 to get highlighted usage of a variable within one class
This is just on top of my head. I am sure I forgot something.

Jacques

"David J. Stennett" <david@intellij.com> wrote in message news:apasj2$irn$1@is.intellij.net...

Dear Fellow IntelliJ Fanatics and Community Supporters! J



I would like to introduce to all of you a little something we have been
working on . the IDEA 3.0 Overview. I am releasing a EAP version of it. for
your reading pleasure (I hope). Be warned! It isn't yet complete; however,
it is nearing completion and this is why I am releasing it now. I would
like to kindly ask those of you who do read it to send me feedback in any
form you see fit: corrections to the text, technical corrections about Java
(I've yet to bother the developers for them to check my often erratic bold
statements about Java), or even suggestions on what you would like to see
covered in the final version of the overview.



Please keep in mind, this overview is not meant (as noted in the intro) to
be a purely technical document, nor is it supposed to be an "aren't we so
great" marketing document. it lies probably somewhere in the middle. Just
think of it this way. if you knew nothing about IDEA, would this booklet
entice you to try IDEA? Or, for those of you wanting to convince your boss
to switch to IDEA, would this tickle him in the right places to listen to
your request?



Those of you who provide constructive feedback (to be determined by me,
Mhaaaaaaa) will get your names listed in the "acknowledgement" section of
the final version (both in electronic form, and if we do it, in the printed
as well!). This isn't a con, I just want to sincerely give credit where
credit is due to the community members who have been an instrumental part in
helping IntelliJ IDEA become what it is today.



Also, please post your feedback in the jetbrains.intellij.documentation
forum.. I'll be reading and sometimes replying to your post to get more
clarification when needed. You can download this overview from the EAP
section of www.intellij.net | EAP | Newest Build



Best!



David



JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



Note Bene! Please excuse the quality of the screenshots.... Adobe's Acrobat
Writer did a hachet job to them... they aren't so bad in the original .doc
files (honestly!).


0
Comment actions Permalink

Hi David!

Great that this document finally exist! Now my colleagues and others
wont have to take my word for it, but read for themselves...

Some comments:

  • Sometimes, the text comes off as chatty; it's got a nice personal tone

(which I try to aspire to myself when writing docs), but sometimes its a
little too many exclamation marks, if you see what I mean. I do this
myself a lot, so I know how easy it is. If there would be just a little
bit less of this, it would become a "personal relief" -- as opposed to
comic relief -- from every other white paper / red book out there.

  • Related to the above is the use of adjectives. Even though I agree to

all of them ("super intelligent", "creates for you a new, unscathed and
pristine method"), it adds to the "chatty" imporession.

  • Both of the above points make this document less suitable to show to

your managers and bosses (who do not know the art of developing with
pleasure). Tighten it it up a little and it will be perfect.

  • Minor layout stuff, that I'm sure you're aware of (pics overflowing,

captions not consistently placed etc.)

cheers,
/M?ns

David J. Stennett wrote:

Dear Fellow IntelliJ Fanatics and Community Supporters! J



I would like to introduce to all of you a little something we have been
working on . the IDEA 3.0 Overview. I am releasing a EAP version of it. for
your reading pleasure (I hope). Be warned! It isn't yet complete; however,
it is nearing completion and this is why I am releasing it now. I would
like to kindly ask those of you who do read it to send me feedback in any
form you see fit: corrections to the text, technical corrections about Java
(I've yet to bother the developers for them to check my often erratic bold
statements about Java), or even suggestions on what you would like to see
covered in the final version of the overview.



Please keep in mind, this overview is not meant (as noted in the intro) to
be a purely technical document, nor is it supposed to be an "aren't we so
great" marketing document. it lies probably somewhere in the middle. Just
think of it this way. if you knew nothing about IDEA, would this booklet
entice you to try IDEA? Or, for those of you wanting to convince your boss
to switch to IDEA, would this tickle him in the right places to listen to
your request?



Those of you who provide constructive feedback (to be determined by me,
Mhaaaaaaa) will get your names listed in the "acknowledgement" section of
the final version (both in electronic form, and if we do it, in the printed
as well!). This isn't a con, I just want to sincerely give credit where
credit is due to the community members who have been an instrumental part in
helping IntelliJ IDEA become what it is today.



Also, please post your feedback in the jetbrains.intellij.documentation
forum.. I'll be reading and sometimes replying to your post to get more
clarification when needed. You can download this overview from the EAP
section of www.intellij.net | EAP | Newest Build



Best!



David



JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



Note Bene! Please excuse the quality of the screenshots.... Adobe's Acrobat
Writer did a hachet job to them... they aren't so bad in the original .doc
files (honestly!).



0
Comment actions Permalink

David, you didn't mention, or rarely mentioned the fact,
that Idea is extremely configurable, starting from IDE Preferences, through
the Project Properties, Keyboard Mapping, Live Templates, File Templates,
External Tools and so on.

Also keyboard-friendliness is worth mentioning.
I personally haven't seen an IDE which is such keyboard friendly.



0
Comment actions Permalink

Hi David,

thanks for this one. Now there is a document to give to the
bosses for convincing them that IDEA is the right tool - if not the
increased productivity with the EAP builds has already done.

Some feedback:
What I personally really missed in the document is the instant
syntax/code checker. Maybe it's not that clear to bosses or
managers, but this one is a real big timesaver and absolutely one of
IDEA's outstanding features. No more trial-and-error programming,
letting the compiler find some errors, switching back to editor, and
so on. I don't know how I could live without that.

Some points that maybe are also worth mentioning:
- TODO highlighting/configuration
- Easy generation of javadoc stubs (bosses like this!)
- Project/Structure tool windows for easy navigation


Another one: In the chapter Collaboration Tools you mention the
Jikes compiler - be aware that it is no longer bundled with IDEA
but must be installed seperately due to different problems with the
latest versions of Jikes.

I know you are probably already aware of this, but I just mention
it: The screenshots look like they were taken with different builds
of IDEA, some are older, some newer ones. I also noticed that in
some screenshots all class names (even core-classes) are highlighted
in red (improperly configured JDK?), in some they are not.


Regards,

Sascha

"David J. Stennett" <david@intellij.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:apasj2$irn$1@is.intellij.net...

Dear Fellow IntelliJ Fanatics and Community Supporters! J

>
>
>

I would like to introduce to all of you a little something we have been
working on . the IDEA 3.0 Overview. I am releasing a EAP version of it.

for

your reading pleasure (I hope). Be warned! It isn't yet complete;

however,

it is nearing completion and this is why I am releasing it now. I would
like to kindly ask those of you who do read it to send me feedback in any
form you see fit: corrections to the text, technical corrections about

Java

(I've yet to bother the developers for them to check my often erratic bold
statements about Java), or even suggestions on what you would like to see
covered in the final version of the overview.

>
>
>

Please keep in mind, this overview is not meant (as noted in the intro) to
be a purely technical document, nor is it supposed to be an "aren't we so
great" marketing document. it lies probably somewhere in the middle. Just
think of it this way. if you knew nothing about IDEA, would this booklet
entice you to try IDEA? Or, for those of you wanting to convince your

boss

to switch to IDEA, would this tickle him in the right places to listen to
your request?

>
>
>

Those of you who provide constructive feedback (to be determined by me,
Mhaaaaaaa) will get your names listed in the "acknowledgement" section of
the final version (both in electronic form, and if we do it, in the

printed

as well!). This isn't a con, I just want to sincerely give credit where
credit is due to the community members who have been an instrumental part

in

helping IntelliJ IDEA become what it is today.

>
>
>

Also, please post your feedback in the jetbrains.intellij.documentation
forum.. I'll be reading and sometimes replying to your post to get more
clarification when needed. You can download this overview from the EAP
section of www.intellij.net | EAP | Newest Build

>
>
>

Best!

>
>
>

David

>
>
>

JetBrains, Inc
http://www.intellij.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

>
>
>

Note Bene! Please excuse the quality of the screenshots.... Adobe's

Acrobat

Writer did a hachet job to them... they aren't so bad in the original .doc
files (honestly!).

>
>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

My comments:

The opening paragraphs are very important to get right since they will give
the reader either a positive or negative first impression.

- as M?ns pointed out, the first thing that struck me was the use of "super
intelligent". Perhaps "Extremely intelligent", "very intelligent", or just
plain old "intelligent" :)
- "a wide range of J2EE development features for rapid web-application
development". This should not be restricted to web-applications. Maybe
"rapid web-application and other enterprise development".

- Change the live templates example to be an iteration over an ArrayList
rather than a Vector. Any good java developer knows that ArrayLists should
be used instead of Vectors whereever possible. Also, point out that the live
template is smart enough to typecast the Vector/ArrayList retrieval
appropriately when possible. I know you can see that if you look carefully
at the code that is generated, but it's not obvious to the casual observer,
and it's a detail that impressed the hell out of me when I first saw it
happen (And the 2nd and 3rd time too for that matter ;-).

- Before the 'search for usages' example, demonstrate ctrl-shift-f7. I love
that key-combo! Besides, it's a good leadup to the search for usages
functionality.
- Code layout - "In addition to highlighting individual blocks of code, the
code layout feature also allows you to format entire classes and even entire
projects all at the stroke of a key.". Minor point, but you could also
mention packages: "...also allows you to format classes, packages, or even
entire projects all at the stroke of a key.".
- Optimise imports. Similarly, it's not obvious from your text that you can
optimise classes, packages or your entire project.
- Ctrl-N. Add mention of Ctrl-Shift-N.
- Minor improvement. In your debugging 1.2 figure, show one of the objects
as an expanded tree. Also, perhaps show at least part of the breakpoint
properties dialog. That's very powerful functionality that a good developer
will spot and appreciate.
- Refactoring section: "...more than 25 different refactoring methods in
toto." in toto? Should that be "in total"?
- Renaming, figure 1.2. You've got some German(?) text there. Cool, but
perhaps show off a little by including some text with a more unusual
character set. Chinese, Japanese? (disclaimer: I only speak English and have
no experience whatsoever with IDEA and its internationalisation
capabilities).
- Renaming - mention briefly that it is not limited to renaming code, IDEA
can also handle comments and non-Java files (although I suppose Move figure
1.1 covers that).
- Why in figures Move 1.3 and Move 1.5 are the String, StringBuffer classes
highlighted as errors? Forget to configure your JDK? ;) Likewise with
Runnable in 1.6, 1.7 (and many of the other figures in the document too!
Inline Method 1.1, 1.2 etc)
- Introduce variable. Include the shortcut key (ctrl-alt-v) in brackets
somewhere.
- Typo under Variable 1.3 "word.lenght()" should be "word.length()"
- JSP. Mention JSP debugging?
- XML. Mention retrieval of remote resources (DTD).
- XML. Layout XML ctrl-alt-l
- EJBs. Mention ejb-jar.xml generation capabilities. Also, perhaps pad out a
bit with mention of the EJB refactoring functionality.
- EJBs. The paragraph about blood-red error highlighting really applies to
ALL code (and XML/JSP), not just EJBs (although I appreciate there is an
advantage to mentioning the deployment errors specifically).

- Mention Glue/web-services support? Not that I've had a chance to use it
yet, so I'm not quite sure what it does :-). But, rightly or wrongly,
web-services is such a buzzword these days that at least a passing mention
must be worthwhile.

Hope this helps
Chris Miller


0
Comment actions Permalink

Also, don't forget that class completion works in XML too!
<a-tag>com.yada<ctrl-space> etc


"Chris Miller" <chris_overseas@hotmail.c0m> wrote in message
news:apb75d$t5q$1@is.intellij.net...

My comments:

>

The opening paragraphs are very important to get right since they will

give

the reader either a positive or negative first impression.

>

- as M?ns pointed out, the first thing that struck me was the use of

"super

intelligent". Perhaps "Extremely intelligent", "very intelligent", or just
plain old "intelligent" :)
- "a wide range of J2EE development features for rapid web-application
development". This should not be restricted to web-applications. Maybe
"rapid web-application and other enterprise development".

>

- Change the live templates example to be an iteration over an ArrayList
rather than a Vector. Any good java developer knows that ArrayLists should
be used instead of Vectors whereever possible. Also, point out that the

live

template is smart enough to typecast the Vector/ArrayList retrieval
appropriately when possible. I know you can see that if you look carefully
at the code that is generated, but it's not obvious to the casual

observer,

and it's a detail that impressed the hell out of me when I first saw it
happen (And the 2nd and 3rd time too for that matter ;).

>

- Before the 'search for usages' example, demonstrate ctrl-shift-f7. I

love

that key-combo! Besides, it's a good leadup to the search for usages
functionality.
- Code layout - "In addition to highlighting individual blocks of code,

the

code layout feature also allows you to format entire classes and even

entire

projects all at the stroke of a key.". Minor point, but you could also
mention packages: "...also allows you to format classes, packages, or even
entire projects all at the stroke of a key.".
- Optimise imports. Similarly, it's not obvious from your text that you

can

optimise classes, packages or your entire project.
- Ctrl-N. Add mention of Ctrl-Shift-N.
- Minor improvement. In your debugging 1.2 figure, show one of the objects
as an expanded tree. Also, perhaps show at least part of the breakpoint
properties dialog. That's very powerful functionality that a good

developer

will spot and appreciate.
- Refactoring section: "...more than 25 different refactoring methods in
toto." in toto? Should that be "in total"?
- Renaming, figure 1.2. You've got some German(?) text there. Cool, but
perhaps show off a little by including some text with a more unusual
character set. Chinese, Japanese? (disclaimer: I only speak English and

have

no experience whatsoever with IDEA and its internationalisation
capabilities).
- Renaming - mention briefly that it is not limited to renaming code, IDEA
can also handle comments and non-Java files (although I suppose Move

figure

1.1 covers that).
- Why in figures Move 1.3 and Move 1.5 are the String, StringBuffer

classes

highlighted as errors? Forget to configure your JDK? ;) Likewise with
Runnable in 1.6, 1.7 (and many of the other figures in the document too!
Inline Method 1.1, 1.2 etc)
- Introduce variable. Include the shortcut key (ctrl-alt-v) in brackets
somewhere.
- Typo under Variable 1.3 "word.lenght()" should be "word.length()"
- JSP. Mention JSP debugging?
- XML. Mention retrieval of remote resources (DTD).
- XML. Layout XML ctrl-alt-l
- EJBs. Mention ejb-jar.xml generation capabilities. Also, perhaps pad out

a

bit with mention of the EJB refactoring functionality.
- EJBs. The paragraph about blood-red error highlighting really applies to
ALL code (and XML/JSP), not just EJBs (although I appreciate there is an
advantage to mentioning the deployment errors specifically).

>

- Mention Glue/web-services support? Not that I've had a chance to use it
yet, so I'm not quite sure what it does :-). But, rightly or wrongly,
web-services is such a buzzword these days that at least a passing mention
must be worthwhile.

>

Hope this helps
Chris Miller

>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

Sascha Weinreuter wrote:

Some points that maybe are also worth mentioning:

- Easy generation of javadoc stubs (bosses like this!)


+1
I would also mention the error checking in the javadocs. That does make sure
that you do not generate javadocs for nothing (e.g. like the
Preference-Javadocs in 1.4.0, where some keywords were misspelled). Also:
CodeCompletition in javadoc (I did not read all of the code-completition
part, that's why I am not sure if you mentioned that there.

Good support for commenting lead to more comments...

I know you are probably already aware of this, but I just mention
it: The screenshots look like they were taken with different builds
of IDEA, some are older, some newer ones. I also noticed that in
some screenshots all class names (even core-classes) are highlighted
in red (improperly configured JDK?), in some they are not.


Additionally some of them are hard to read (I am not using Windows).
Especially those down on page (Live Templates).

Best regards,

Dirk Dittert

0
Comment actions Permalink

Chris Miller wrote:

- as M?ns pointed out, the first thing that struck me was the use of
"super intelligent". Perhaps "Extremely intelligent", "very intelligent",
or just plain old "intelligent" :)


I am not a native English speaker but "super intelligent" does not sound
appropriate to me. I would prefer something like "very/highly
sophisticated". If you want me to, I can ask some of the Americans around
how they would have expressed that ;)

Best regards,

Dirk Dittert

0
Comment actions Permalink

And as far as the configuration goes... the fact that things like Code Style
have their own xml file that can be shared... Huge Plus and very notable.
At my company I am the official keeper of said xml files, and have become a
huge hero for making them so useful (they think it me... I know it's you
all...)

So, my vote for a new section to the doc: Config, and how it can be Shared

thanks,
adam

"Michal Szklanowski" <mszklano@wp.pl> wrote in message
news:apavmq$mda$1@is.intellij.net...

David, you didn't mention, or rarely mentioned the fact,
that Idea is extremely configurable, starting from IDE Preferences,

through

the Project Properties, Keyboard Mapping, Live Templates, File Templates,
External Tools and so on.

>

Also keyboard-friendliness is worth mentioning.
I personally haven't seen an IDE which is such keyboard friendly.

>
>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

+1 on that. Keyboard-friendliness is the #1 reason I'm currently giving
IDEA a spin. (I've been an emacs user for 15 years.)

"Michal Szklanowski" <mszklano@wp.pl> wrote in message
news:apavmq$mda$1@is.intellij.net...

>

Also keyboard-friendliness is worth mentioning.
I personally haven't seen an IDE which is such keyboard friendly.



0
Comment actions Permalink

I agree--"super intelligent" reminds me of "Wile E. Coyote, Super Genius".

"Dirk Dittert" <dittert@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:apc7r6$4ps$2@is.intellij.net...

Chris Miller wrote:

>

- as M?ns pointed out, the first thing that struck me was the use of
"super intelligent". Perhaps "Extremely intelligent", "very

intelligent",

or just plain old "intelligent" :)

>

I am not a native English speaker but "super intelligent" does not sound
appropriate to me. I would prefer something like "very/highly
sophisticated". If you want me to, I can ask some of the Americans around
how they would have expressed that ;)



0
Comment actions Permalink

I marked up the document using Acrobat. I was hesitant to post a 1MB
document to the newsgroup, so it's on its way to you via email. Here are a
few overall comments, though.

First, I'm glad to see some documentation activity. Although I've enjoyed
participating in the EAP, the lack of product documentation has often been
(and continues to be) frustrating.

Secondly, this document confuses me. I like the idea of an overview. I'm
comfortable with its conversational tone. and I like having some screen
shots and examples. Perhaps it's the disparity in detail that bothers me.
Some sections are so detailed you even say what keyboard shortcut to use.
this is great tutorial information -- but I thought this wasn't supposed to
be a tutorial. Other sections are so high-level and abstract (like the
OpenAPI section) that it leaves me with no concrete information about the
product's capabilities.

If you wanted to convince me to try IDEA, a more detailed spec sheet of the
product's capabilities would be more effective. I would be looking for a few
features that are mundane, but which represent "must-have" functionality:

- Good integration with Visual SourceSafe

- Plays well with web app servers (e.g. Tomcat)

- Allows project files and associated prefs to be shared among developers

- Fast edit/compile/run cycle time

- Debugger

Features that would really pique my interest would include things like
these:

- Navigation: editor popup menu provides an easy way to get at
class/menu/field declarations, implementations, and usages. (Much faster and
more effective than performing a text-based search).

- Good text search, including Find in Path and regular expression support.

- Refactoring. Even the simplest example of renaming a method and letting
IDEA fix all references is pretty profound. I'll probably never have
occasion to use 90% of the refactoring functions, but this one alone is
worth it.

- Intelligent editing with code completion, syntax highlighting, and syntax
checking (or whatever you're calling it -- the red and yellow indicators on
the right side of the editor pane). Support for this in JSP was a
significant improvement from our previous IDE; intelligent XML editing is
also a big plus. Little features like filling in the JavaDoc template are
nice bonuses.

- Quick JavaDoc can be useful at times.

- Code Inspection to detect inconsistencies or potential problems in the
code. (Realistically, it's never identified a bug in my code. but I've
enjoyed playing with it and it's allowed me to clean up some code.)




0
Comment actions Permalink

Hello Adam:

I believe in the "Code Manager Layout" section I briefly mention this
fact... that you can share the "layout" specs with others. I'll elaborate
on this more.

Thanks for the feedback.

David


"Adam Goldband" <adamg@cnet.com> wrote in message
news:apcd1u$8b4$1@is.intellij.net...

And as far as the configuration goes... the fact that things like Code

Style

have their own xml file that can be shared... Huge Plus and very notable.
At my company I am the official keeper of said xml files, and have become

a

huge hero for making them so useful (they think it me... I know it's you
all...)

>

So, my vote for a new section to the doc: Config, and how it can be

Shared
>

thanks,
adam

>

"Michal Szklanowski" <mszklano@wp.pl> wrote in message
news:apavmq$mda$1@is.intellij.net...

David, you didn't mention, or rarely mentioned the fact,
that Idea is extremely configurable, starting from IDE Preferences,

through

the Project Properties, Keyboard Mapping, Live Templates, File

Templates,

External Tools and so on.

>

Also keyboard-friendliness is worth mentioning.
I personally haven't seen an IDE which is such keyboard friendly.

>
>
>

>
>


0
Comment actions Permalink

just saw a typo on the page 41...

Shift Shift the selected lines to the right

shouldn't this be

Tab Shift the selected lines to the right

Aiko

intellij wrote:

I marked up the document using Acrobat. I was hesitant to post a 1MB
document to the newsgroup, so it's on its way to you via email. Here are a
few overall comments, though.

>

First, I'm glad to see some documentation activity. Although I've enjoyed
participating in the EAP, the lack of product documentation has often been
(and continues to be) frustrating.

>

Secondly, this document confuses me. I like the idea of an overview. I'm
comfortable with its conversational tone. and I like having some screen
shots and examples. Perhaps it's the disparity in detail that bothers me.
Some sections are so detailed you even say what keyboard shortcut to use.
this is great tutorial information -- but I thought this wasn't
supposed to
be a tutorial. Other sections are so high-level and abstract (like the
OpenAPI section) that it leaves me with no concrete information about the
product's capabilities.

>

If you wanted to convince me to try IDEA, a more detailed spec sheet
of the
product's capabilities would be more effective. I would be looking for
a few
features that are mundane, but which represent "must-have" functionality:

>

- Good integration with Visual SourceSafe

>

- Plays well with web app servers (e.g. Tomcat)

>

- Allows project files and associated prefs to be shared among developers

>

- Fast edit/compile/run cycle time

>

- Debugger

>

Features that would really pique my interest would include things like
these:

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- Navigation: editor popup menu provides an easy way to get at
class/menu/field declarations, implementations, and usages. (Much
faster and
more effective than performing a text-based search).

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- Good text search, including Find in Path and regular expression support.

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- Refactoring. Even the simplest example of renaming a method and letting
IDEA fix all references is pretty profound. I'll probably never have
occasion to use 90% of the refactoring functions, but this one alone is
worth it.

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- Intelligent editing with code completion, syntax highlighting, and
syntax
checking (or whatever you're calling it -- the red and yellow
indicators on
the right side of the editor pane). Support for this in JSP was a
significant improvement from our previous IDE; intelligent XML editing is
also a big plus. Little features like filling in the JavaDoc template are
nice bonuses.

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- Quick JavaDoc can be useful at times.

>

- Code Inspection to detect inconsistencies or potential problems in the
code. (Realistically, it's never identified a bug in my code. but I've
enjoyed playing with it and it's allowed me to clean up some code.)

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