Unexpected application exit under IDEA

I'm getting a very strange and unexpected application exit when running/debugging in IDEA on Windows XP SP2.

The application is a standard Java client GUI that logs in to a server to access data. Until last week, it has been running fine in various versions in and out of IDEA for a couple of years.

The problem that has started is that when running under IDEA and the login dialog is displayed waiting for the password to be entered, any key press causes an immediate application exit, with the message:

Process finished with exit code -1073741819

There are no console error messages, nothing in the application log, nothing in the IDEA log, and nothing in the Windows event logs. If I set IDEA to break on any exception, no exception is trapped.

This happens regardless of the JVM version I use to run the application, and regardless of which version of IDEA I run it on. If I run exactly the same class files from a batch on the Windows command line, the login dialog works as expected - allowing you to type a password and log in.

I've tries changing the memory options, and debugging with the verbose setting, but I just can't find what's happening.

Has anyone got any ideas?

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Two possibilities come immediately to mind:

1) Your system has been compromised and an "imperfection" in the hack is manifesting in this way.

2) A shared library (native code) file used when your application is run under the debugger has become corrupted and this leads to the crash.


Have you looked in the Windows system-level logs for any record of something going awry?


Randall Schulz

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Thanks for the response Randall - I don't think the system's been compromised - we have a tightly controlled internal network and all PCs run virus scanners, on-access security, etc. Apart from this, it's pretty rare for Java apps to be involved in malicious hacks.

The Windows system event logs show nothing unusual at all.

I thought about corrupted libraries, so I uninstalled and reinstalled all the Java JDKs and JREs, and deleted and checked out all dependency jars we use, but it didn't help.

I can't understand why there doesn't seem to be any error output at all - if you run out of memory, the app may crash out, but there's an 'out of memory' error logged to the console. Here, I can find nothing but the exit code...

Edited by: Dave Lorde on Jun 23, 2008 10:04 PM

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David,

Here's something I usually check right away, but for some reason escaped me this time:

-1073741819 == C0000005

(where "==" here is 32-bit 2s complement, of course)

This may help you search the Web for issues. All I could ascertain (knowing little about the context surrounding your encounter) is that this is ACCESS_VIOLATION (roughly equivalent to SIGSEGV for Unix types).

It's possible this is a hardware problem. Perhaps you should run some diagnostics. Memtest86+ (http://www.memtest.org/) is excellent, at least for disclosing RAM problems. If you have CPU or other problems, it may or may not detect them (and will probably diagnose them as memory problems...).

(And if you're running outside an environmentally controlled setting and were in California up 'til last Sunday, maybe it was heat related...)


Randall Schulz

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Thanks Randall - it occurred to me the return value might have some meaning, but I didn't get that far - that could be very useful :)

I'll run the hardware diagnostics and check my drivers, etc.

Thanks again.

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I appear to have fixed the problem (famous last words!) - by the simple expedient of re-arranging the order of libraries in the project dependencies...

This is a bit odd, as this part of the project hasn't changed in months, but I guess it's possible that an updated library may have caused the problem by including a problematic class that was found before a non-problematic version. A bit worrying.

Thanks Randall, for your help and suggestions.

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