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No; you can try WebStorm Early Access Preview builds - they give the access to the new features we're currently working on and are free to use.
Note also that we have special programs you can try applying to - please contact sales for information about existing programs/discounts

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I think it's a mistake not to have a community edition for WebStorm.  I can't count the number of online classes, YouTube videos, conference demos, and other presentations I've seen over the last year that used the free VS Code IDE. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever seen a conference talk or YouTube tutorial that used WebStorm. This represents lost mindshare.

As someone who does these talks and who is planning to post some online videos and training, I simply cannot expect someone to shell out money for a tool to use in the class or to follow along in a presentation.

I understand there are ways to work around this, as the answer above shows, but again, that would never be a "trick" I'd recommend to an audience.  I'll never send them to a non-GA, EAP version and hope that everything is stable enough for them not to stumble because of an unreleased tool.

Without a WebStorm community edition, like almost everyone else, I'll simply use VS Code in my talks, thus moving students and attendees farther away from JetBrains.

Fwiw, I have a full, every-tool-included, annual JetBrains subscription, so I'm not saying this to save a few bucks myself.  I'm merely pointing out that in client-side web application development, VS Code is eating your lunch, at least as far as public perception goes.

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As the owner if the VS code discord I can say that Webstorm is still much more productive for me, even though I tried to move to VS code.

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A community version would be appreciated...

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I too believe that not providing a  community edition for WebStorm is a mistake. I simply do not get why there is a community edition for  IntelliJ, the Java IDE. Not sure what the market share for  Java is these days, but I'm pretty sure that the web market is a lot bigger and Webstorm, as a product, can win much more market share with a community edition. It's basically  FREE marketing. As the people above  I too own a Jetbrains full product license, so I'm not looking to save a buck or two with this. I just think this move would be a very good one for both the product and the community 

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Strongly agree with Jack Frosch. A community edition will be a game changer for JetBrains. If someone has used VS Code while learning to code will most probably continue using it on their job as well.

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Sheesh its like £50 a year for a much superior product to config horror VScode, don't be so cheap people.

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Jack, every single one of my youtube videos uses webstorm, good enough for you?

 

 

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I hope there never is a community addition as I don't want the product quality to go down to the lowest level. I use webstorm every working day to make a decent living. 

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We’d lie if we said that we’d never thought about introducing a community edition of WebStorm. Unfortunately, it’s not feasible right now, mainly because the WebStorm functionality is included in a lot of other JetBrains IDEs. So, if we made such a radical change, we’d have to fully restructure the existing sales model and, what’s more, the entire platform architecture. It’s a significant commitment that we aren’t ready to make at the moment. Anyway, we try to support the community in other different ways, such as giving away WebStorm subscriptions to open-source projects or providing discounts for students and educational institutions. Plus, we keep the WebStorm price relatively low for individuals (it’s just US $59 a year, and the price goes down every next year of use) so that more individual developers can afford it.
Note that the 30-day free trial is available for every major product update (e.g. WebStorm 2019.2, 2019.3, 2020.1...). We have 3 major releases a year, it means that you can run a free trial version 3 times a year for 30 days after every release.

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Please include a community edition for webstorm, it'd go a long way in helping people

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Like I understand that this is an age-old question of whether or not JetBrains will release a community edition of WebStorm or not. As much as I'd like one, it's most likely against their business model. They are more likely to introduce a community edition of some other IDE like rider because of unity support, not WebStorm. Why?

Let's say they do. Most of the people here use IntelliJ idea which is their flagship IDE. Now let's say they suddenly decided that they want to use java as a backend what do they do, well they can use the IntelliJ idea community edition for writing java backend and WebStorm community edition for writing the front-end, which to JetBrains they lose out on a customer that would have purchased IntelliJ professional also same applies for PyCharm community edition.
The PyCharm and IntelliJ idea community edition are there for users to get hooked to the IDE's and then buy the professional IDE's because of how much they love it. Being a student I get all of them for free, and now I have been hooked to it because good it is. So when I finish my uni I will eventually buy it, because of how much a part of life it has become.

So no, I don't expect there to be a community edition for WebStorm but more likely for other languages. To me, a Rider community edition seems more likely.

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@Rodude123,  you make some valid points, however, the problem that you describe there can be solved by licensing. You can enforce community edition limitations trough the license and prevent using the tools commercially.  I feel that the front-end community is much more appealing than the java community. There are a lot more eyes on the shiny front-end frameworks that pop up every other day and all those eyes could see WebStorm instead of vs-code , for example.  I can understand why they won't do it, but  I don't have to agree

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I'm a professional dev myself. A relative of mine is considering swapping careers so I was thinking to show them some HTML/CSS/JS basics. Having an IDE to help them out with their first steps is an obvious choice compared to just a text editor. I'm actually surprised that IntelliJ and PyCharm have a CE, but WebStorm doesn't. Personally I love your IDEs (I use them daily; previously I've purchased them myself, nowadays my company pays for them) so it's a real shame this new person I'm introducing to "the way of the code" 🙂 won't be able to experience their first steps in WebStorm. We're going to have to go with VS Code, it seems... Cases like this one aren't covered by your student plan, FYI, just to point it out. And they're obviously not going to buy a license if they don't even know yet if this is the correct career path for them.

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Marko Vodanovic. If he doesn't know if that is the correct career path for him he shouldn't be looking into a Jetbrains' IDE in the first place. Don't take me wrong, I can't live without IntelliJ and I can't stand VSCode or actually any other tool out there; but if you are completely new to this you are unlikely to be capable of understanding why would anyone choose an IDE that takes up a lot of space and has a lot of menus, and sidebars, and panels and oh! is way to cluttered if you can do the exact same thing with a simple text editor like code. Jetbrains products are professional tools and they are meant for professional users. The first time i made an electron app with more than 2000 lines of code was when i realized that vscode wasn't practical in large applications, but if your are just making some basic HTML5 project you're probably better off with code anyway. If you're just playing around with stuff and not doing real work you won't find any advantages in using Webstorm over any text editor.

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Lazaroofarrill I couldn't disagree more. You think a user will be lost with WebStorm menus, just wait until they face a blank NotePad window and get no help with code completion, no indications of compile errors until running the compiler, no links to API documentation, and no way to navigate between classes, no way to refactor code, no way to see a project's organization at a glance, no way to launch a terminal window from inside NotePad, no version control support, etc.

For the extra cost of a learning curve added by learning an IDE, there are 10x as many language, framework, and API learning impediments removed by using an IDE.

That said, JetBrains might think of enabling a "Beginner Mode" or similar to clear away as much of the clutter as possible. Then the IDE could offer benefits with less learning curve.

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Jack Frosch Well that's just my personal experience. When I first started programming C++ I was faced with two choices at the time Codeblocks and QtCreator. With QtCreator I had to setup Qt5 Version. Open a new project select the correct type of project to build only to find myself with a .pro archive. cmakelists, include folders and unknown libraries included by default that didn't show up in my "Learn C++ as if you were in first year" book. With codeblocks on the other hand i could create a main.cpp anywhere i wanted write the main function and hit build and run. Nowadays I wouldn't open Codeblocks even if you paid me, but at the time it's simplicity was quite more appealing than that of qtcreator, an extremely superior IDE. When I see new students in my college using Codeblocks i go nuts like: what are you doing use qtcreator, us Visual Studio, use Clion. why are using that piece of ...? But it's really hard to let go; when your are just a beginner you look for the solution that looks more simple the less clicking and the less choices  the better.

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The first text editor I have used was vs code. The second was PyCharm. PyCharm is such a fantastic editor ... I love it! It's amazing! And I am thrilled to test WebStorm for my next JavaScript based project, and if it is nearly as great as PyCharm, I will happily pay the individual's fee. I strongly agree with Jack Frosch and Marko Vodanovic; I think your great product is sadly losing on many opportunities to be installed on many machines, either by experienced programmers or people new to programming. I really believe that a Community Edition as to it is available for PyCharm will be a great leap for the popularity of JetBrains / WebStorm ... I have spent a lot of time learning how to code online in 2020 and I have never come across "WebStorm" before. Instead, I've read "Visual Studio Code" everywhere. And I would be very happy to see the community mentionning and recommending your products (or WebStorm, more specifically) as well. :)

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