Why isn't there a CodeStorm for any languages I want to use that JetBrains supports?

I've been using PHPStorm mainly for LAMP-stack, but as I've gotten into JavaScript-based languages (like Node), I found PHPStorm also works for those.

However, I feel odd asking questions about PHPStorm when it comes to non-PHP back-end languages (like Node) or when I'm not using PHP at all in the project.

I've tried WebStorm and it's fine, and I keep PHPStorm just for economical reasons, but I don't know why there isn't just 1 editor for all of these languages that JetBrains allows to work and be plugged into their editors.

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I don't know why there isn't just 1 editor for all of these languages that JetBrains allows to work and be plugged into their editors.

It's called IDEA Ultimate. Although it doesn't include all languages (C++, C#, Swift are not supported), it's the closest product to be called CodeStorm.

However, I feel odd asking questions about PHPStorm when it comes to non-PHP back-end languages (like Node) or when I'm not using PHP at all in the project.

Not sure I follow you. Why do you feel odd?

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I tried IntelliJ IDEA at a previous job when trying to use PHP and JavaScript projects (one was in WordPress, the other just front-end Angular), and IDEA ran SLOW AS MUD. I discovered that it was because it was because I had to add plugins for PHP and JavaScript which it wasn't built or optimized for, but it was for Java. How do I know IDEA Ultimate won't perform badly between PHP and JavaScript projects? I would also like to use it for Node, React, HTML/CSS & vanilla JavaScript, and other web languages, maybe even Python.

Eclipse performed speedily with any languages it was compatible with.

The whole issue is that JetBrains has all these different *Storm/IDEA* editors built upon the same technology, yet the editors are problematic when using languages they were not originally meant for. I'm not understanding the costly and seemingly unnecessary and inefficient fragmentation.

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However, I feel odd asking questions about PHPStorm when it comes to non-PHP back-end languages (like Node) or when I'm not using PHP at all in the project.

"Not sure I follow you. Why do you feel odd?"

(I don't remember how to mark your question as a quote, sorry)

So, my statement about feeling odd was based on me using PHPStorm for projects that don't use PHP at all, like a Node.js or front-end JavaScript project, and bringing up issues in the editor in relation to the project or just mentioning "I'm using PHPStorm"... and sometimes getting odd looks or questions why I'm using a PHP editor for a JavaScript project, and sometimes even the insular derogatory statement about PHP when it has nothing to do with the project.

If there were a CodeStorm editor from JetBrains, that worked well with whatever (not requiring optimization or intention towards any particular language from the ground up), then I wouldn't feel odd mentioning a PHP editor with other coders or forum readers (even in another forum) on a non-PHP project. 

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Well, it is a somewhat historical naming convention, so we already had that in the past.

Around seven years ago, there was a unified JetBrains WebIDE that is now separated to PhpStorm and WebStorm. While WebStorm is mostly a JavaScript IDE, PhpStorm is a mix of WebStorm (includes all of its functionality) + full-fledged PHP support + DataGrip features. The general idea of fragmentation is to create a variety of tools with flexible pricing policy (WebStorm for JS/Node.js -> PhpStorm for the same features + PHP -> IDEA for all the same plus other languages).

I agree that using PhpStorm without any actual PHP may sound weird to someone in particular but from my observation, the community is already familiar with the PhpStorm different usage scenarios paradigm, so mostly it does not surprise. 

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